New investigation cuts through the haze surrounding ‘smoke-free’ tobacco products

A class of alternative tobacco product called heat-not-burn is quickly gaining in popularity across the globe. The product manufacturers claim that these battery-operated devices produce a “clean,” nicotine-laden vapor that contains fewer irritant and carcinogenic chemicals than a conventional cigarette—and are therefore a less harmful option for tobacco users. New research from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) shows that, although the chemical emissions from these devices are indeed lower than those produced by cigarettes, they are still high enough to raise concern. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1449240174198-2′); }); “We found that the emissions from a widely used heat-not-burn device are not negligible,” said first author Lucia Cancelada, a former affiliate researcher in Berkeley Lab’s Indoor Environment Group. “These products are engineered so that it looks like hardly anything comes out of them; but just because the emissions are minimal doesn’t mean they don’t exist.” In their study, now published in Environmental Science &...

Federal judge gives tobacco manufacturers 10 months to comply with planned tighter FDA regulations | Business

If you are a current subscriber please click Sign Up or Login to activate your digital access. If not, please click Sign Up to subscribe. Please support local journalism by becoming a digital subscriber or adding digital to your newspaper subscription. A federal judge agreed Friday to give the Food and Drug Administration a 10-month timeline for tobacco manufacturers to apply to meet planned enhanced regulations. Judge Paul Grimm for the District of Maryland ruled that manufacturers have until May 11 to file pre-market applications for electronic cigarettes and cigars. The premarket standard requires the FDA to consider products’ risks and benefits to the population as a whole, including users and non-users. A coalition of seven public-health and anti-tobacco groups sued the FDA in March 2018 to accelerate the timetable from August 2022. They asked Grimm to provide only four months from his final ruling. Grimm wrote that a 10-month deadline for products in the marketplace would allow “sufficient time for application submissions that present the information that the FDA needs to access the e-cigarette products, while not delaying longer than necessary.” Goldman Sachs analyst Jud...