Chicken Rental Adds New Revenue | Poultry Industry News

Steve and Lisa Stevenson market their chicken rental business at events such as Celebrate Commemorate Memorial Day in Waterloo, New York. Rental coops such as this help make chicken rental a turnkey operation. The rental includes a coop, birds, food and equipment. Perhaps you rent out some of your farmland, but have you considered renting out chickens? Along the same lines of farm stays, renting out chickens appeals to the desire of non-farmers to get in touch with their rural roots. It also taps into the trend farm-to-table and knowing one’s food source. For farmers, renting chickens can become a profitable revenue stream that also promotes agriculture. In 2013, Phil Tompkins and wife, Jenn, co-founded Rent The Chicken at their home in Freeport, Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh. They had seen renting out chickens listed as a “crazy business idea” online, Phil Tompkins said. Though that firm has since folded, at the time, Phil Tompkins realized that it could provide a means of income, since they already had six chickens. Steve and Lisa Stevenson market their chicken rental business at events such as Celebrate Commemorate Memorial Day in Waterloo, New York. He proposed the idea to h...

Dairy cow slaughter high, but let’s put dairy-beef numbers in perspective

In some circles, increased dairy cow culling and the trend toward more dairy farmers breeding a percentage of their dairy cows and heifers to beef sires has raised concerns over the impact on U.S. beef supplies. Latest data from University of Wisconsin – River Falls ag economics professor, Brenda Boetel, and research assistant, Jared Geiser, shows the importance of dairy-beef to the total U.S. beef supply, but also puts some of those concerns to rest. Dairy animals have been a stable source of total U.S. beef production for some time, contributing to the total beef supply in three ways (in order by volume): finished steers, cull cows and finished heifers. In 2018: In 2018, total U.S. commercial beef production was 26.9 billion pounds, the highest total since 2002. While dairy-beef contributed to that higher total, the increasing size of the native beef cattle herd has had the biggest impact, and dairy-beef’s contribution to the total has been declining incrementally from the highs of 2015. As of Jan. 1, 2019, the number of U.S. beef cows were estimated at 31.77 million head, up 299,500 head from the year before. In contrast, the number of U.S. dairy cows was estimated at 9.35 m...