A mix of clouds and sun with gusty winds. High 78F. Winds S at 25 to 35 mph. Winds could occasionally gust over 40 mph..

Partly cloudy skies this evening will give way to occasional showers overnight. Thunder possible. Low 48F. Winds NW at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 50%.

Here are the Nebraska by Heart creations so far with locations and artists' statements on the pieces. At the end: a map of where the hearts are located.

Artist's statement: Referring to King Solomon: “For the king had a fleet of ships of Tarshish at sea with fleet of Hiram. Once every three years the fleet of ships of Tarshish used to come bringing gold, silver, ivory, apes and peacocks." 1 Kings 10:22

The peacock was given to the king as an object of splendor and opulence. A gift to gain favor. The display of feathers is a glory in nature.

The shape of a heart lends itself to an image of the spreading feathers of a peacock. Each year the peacock loses the tail feathers and re-grows new feathers for the next mating season.

Art has interpreted the peacock with many different approaches. Realism to the abstract. Taking artistic license with elements of design. My approach was to bring both into the “Renewed Glory”.

Artist's statement: Born and raised in Lincoln, Jewel studied art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and obtained a Bachelors of Fine Arts Degree. Always fond of travel and the arts of different cultures she has tried many styles of art through several mediums. From Manuscripts with egg tempera and black gall ink on vellum to Australian Aboriginal dot art in acrylic on chairs to sewing clothing made from men’s neck ties, her eclectic interests keep her moving on to new ideas and new things. She enjoys many crafts, cake decorating, sewing, screen printing, molding with clay and works in many 2D mediums such as watercolor, guache, charcoal, pencil, ink, oil and acrylic. She has a great love for people so you will find them in much of her work. However, design elements are becoming more prevalent as she has recently added Czech and Native American designs to the top of her interests list. Don’t be surprised on what you see her trying next.

I’ve recently discovered the joy of dot art. I love the bright colors, detail and patterns. I find that it is loved by most from adults to children. Although tribes in Australia and Africa have been doing this style of art for hundreds of years it never seems to get dull. I’ve been dabbing for over a year and everyone seems to enjoy the designs. As for the subject, I have always been fascinated by the movement from night to day and vice versa. The movement of the moon and sun have entranced the world for thousands of years and have sparked everything from calendars for the solstice to worship as gods. As we move into my favorite season, fall, the light of sun grows shorter in our sky and as the darkness grows we know that winter approaches. It is the turn of the great wheel of life.

Patrons: Mary & Dr. Gregory Heidrick, Bob & Jan Fitzsimmons, Dr. Michael McCoy and Betsy & Dr. Jim Bobenhouse

Artist's statement: Inspiration for my Nebraska by Heart design came from the land. Nebraska is full of fertile farmland that sustains its citizens and people around the world. The base of the structure is painted in a modern representational style symbolizing the diverse fields and the rich soils of our state. The heart itself sprouts flowers of many shapes and colors so show the diversity and beauty that our state sustains. There is a great abundance of color in the Nebraska landscape. From spring to fall, if you go out into the countryside, you can see a wide variety of native flowers blooming: pasque flowers, prairie smoke, bellflower, phlox, purple coneflowers, sunflowers, butterfly weed, asters, black-eyed susan, ironweed, goldenrod, and many, many more.

I am a master gardener and teach classes about ornamental gardening and landscape design for joy of it. I love flower and also enjoy being able to share the beauty of plants with friends, family and neighbors. Painting the sculpture with flowers is another opportunity for me to share the natural beauty that Nebraska soils so easily support. Flowers are nature’s jewelry, and that is why I am titling this piece: Jewel of the Heartland.

Artist's statement: Nebraska has a great school system, with many outstanding teachers. The technology we students have available outweighs what many other places have. I’ve been inspired to use this public art project as a way to raise money for a trip to Washington DC this summer, an educational trip put together by the school system. It would be “So Sweet” to use this big art project to help me get to that great opportunity.

Artist's statement: This design is inspired by leadership, which I’ve learned a lot about from Launch Leadership, a great Nebraska organization. The baseball themed design represents a team. Great leaders create great teams. And great teams work together to knock the ball “Out of the Park."

“Love is a powerful source”.  These words were spoken to me the other day by my oncologist and have echoed in my ears continuously since.  One act of love, one gesture, one spoken word can inspire another act of love and this ripple effect has unimaginable power to change a moment.

I moved back to Lincoln, NE one year ago after undergoing treatment for stage 3 breast cancer.  I grew up in Grant, NE (Perkins County) and lived there for 17 years before moving to Los Angeles where I lived for 18 years.  Both places are home, but Nebraska also has a big piece of my heart.

A few weeks ago I was diagnosed with a relapse of metastatic breast cancer.  This is an unimaginable diagnosis and although there is sorrow, what stands out is the love of so many people that has given me strength in this moment. “Wave”… is a love letter and a thank you to all of the people in Nebraska who have been part of my journey.  The wonderful thing about love is that it never runs out.  There is always more.  And not only am I blessed by acts of love, but I can also bless.  Love is not only for me to receive, but for me to freely give.

From our vantage point, we may not always see how one moment impacts another, but when we are given a chance to step back and view the larger picture, we can often see astonishing beauty woven through our lives, through our grief, our pain and our joy.

Artist's statement: A universal depiction of struggle. Nothing in life seems worth as much if it was easy to be had. I believe this to be true.

This is my take on one of the oldest pieces of artwork. I think it will not only be cool to look at, but also very fun to create.

I will sculpt the flames and sword out of styrofoam, have them coated in fiberglass by Patrick Keogh. I will then paint the flames, sword, heart and base, clear coat it and finally wrap it in barbed wire.

Artists' statement: Bri Murphy and Katelyn Farneth are two artists who have always been interested in anatomy. This anatomical interpretation of the heart represents both of their bodies of work simultaneously, pulling from Bri’s sculptural background and Katelyn’s figurative paintings. With their ability to create a highly realistic heart they believe fellow Nebraskans will feel an internal connection to the work and the artists. The heart after all, is the driving force of the body as artists are the innovating force of society.

Artist's statement: “A dog doesn’t care if you’re rich or poor, smart or dumb. Give him your heart…and he’ll give you his." — Milo Gathema

I believe that having a dog around enriches and colors your life. The paw prints are the actual prints from dogs from my family and friends. They are the dogs that I know and love, including my two beloved dogs, Libby and Joey. What better symbol of our love for dogs than a giant heart.

Artist's statement: “In a state of grace, the soul is like a well of transparent water, from which flow only streams of clearest crystal. Its works are pleasing both to God and man, rising from the River of Life, beside which it is rooted like a tree." -- Saint Teresa of Avila

Saint Teresa’s quote was inspiration for “Spirits of the Heartland”. The application of human faces (souls) to the sculpture inscribes the River of Life and reminds us of the pioneers and Native Americans who lived, farmed and settled in Nebraska. Though physical no longer with us, their souls remain in a state of grace and their heritage lends a spiritual connection to the heart shape. The overall design and flow of organic lines (winding tree limbs, river streams) creates a visual of human souls connected and rooted like a tree to this great state of Nebraska.

I am rooted as well, born and raised in Nebraska, I will never leave and I too, will be buried among the Spirits of the Heartland.

Artist's statement: The inspiration for this design comes from the beauty of nature. I selected Nebraska’s state bird the meadowlark and wildflowers native to Nebraska. On a larger scale I would create more varieties of flowers and bright colors. The leaves and vines create a path of movement to help unify the design. The feather motif is repeated on the other side of the heart forming wing encompassing the heart shape. A skeleton key is often incorporated into my work. The key can represent different things to different people. It has an element of mystery about it,wondering what is behind each new door that opens up throughout life. In this case it was intended to honor the past and represent personal identity.The idea of loving the beauty of nature in our state and finding a place to grow, thrive, and call home. The nest represents home and unifies the bird idea shown on the front of the heart.

Artist's statement: The inspiration for my design was to link the past to the present by depicting images from across the state. The wide-open spaces of Western Nebraska represent the days of early settlers and pioneers heading west.I selected my hometown, North Platte, for the central images such as Buffalo Bill Cody’s house at Scouts Rest Ranch with a lasso roping the wind to capture the spirit of the old west. I included the railroad Bailey Yards is the largest railroad classification yard in the world leading to economic growth across the nation. The playful arrangement of tracks create a path of movement for the eye to follow throughout the design. Sandhill Cranes fly overhead during yearly migration to central Nebraska. Ears of corn symbolize the importance of agriculture in our state. The backside focuses on icons of Eastern Nebraska such as the state capital building. The circular design is my interpretation of looking up through the dome at all the beautiful art deco era designs throughout the building. It also looks somewhat like a sun combined with a machine like glimpse of the wheels that turn to keep the big city moving along. A simplified Omaha skyline is nestled next to the Missouri River to form our Eastern border.

Artist's statement: All creatures, human and animal, have a need to settle in a place we call home. If the place provides safety and shelter, it’s good. Add loving camaraderie and the place is the ideal of a home. Besides displaying what I think is an interesting design, this heart is a functioning birdhouse. It symbolizes shelter, and can become a home for any small birds that might enjoy living in each other’s company.

Artist's statement: All children, all people, all animals need food. Nebraska is about producing food…for ourselves, our country, our world. Corn is a good symbol for us; a mascot, a symbol of agriculture, an image of the Midwest.

Artist's statement: You see… Without the sun, the moon had no light. The sun shared her beauty and light so that the moon, himself, could be seen by the world. The moon could not help but fall in love with her. She gave him a gift by sharing her own. She allowed him to be the sun of the night. She allowed him to shine bright in all his glory. Every once in awhile, you will see the sun and the moon in sky together so that their lips may touch once more.

I have always been captivated by the moon. Ever since I was little, I remember wishing upon it like a star. As a photographer and adult artist today… My captivation has only grown for its beauty and mystery. Love has also been one of my captivations as an artist because, like the moon, it is also filled with so much beauty and mystery. One night as I was looking up at the moon and listening to a love song…The two just clicked. I immediately became inspired by the Moon and Sun’s star-crossed love story. I stayed up late that night eager to get the idea down on a canvas. Here in Nebraska, we occasionally have days where the Sun and the Moon share the sky together. I cannot help but believe that these are the days designed for the two to meet face to face once more.

Artist's statement: The concept for the Moonlight & Romeo Sculpture is inspired by Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet ~ A modern-day Juliet waits patiently for her Romeo under a heart-shaped moon for all eternity. The moon is painted gold with black shading and real gold leafing. Juliet is made of a fiberglass mannequin. Her dress is made from reproduction pages of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. The pages are printed on waterproof and fade proof paper. The bodice is black with gold swarovski crystal accents. The pages of her skirting are sculpted onto a metal armature. The color scheme is inspired by moonlight, the ceiling disks at the Sheldon Art Museum and the works of Gustav Klimt.

Artist's statement: The concept for the Save a Little Room for Magic sculpture is inspired by J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan and Wendy. A reminder not to darken our hearts to the magic within our own imaginations. At the base of the piece, a metal and paper replica of the book lays open to chapter one. The pages look as though they are magically blowing in the breeze and billow upwards. The black heart represents the night sky, and Captain Hook’s ship is right on course to Neverland on a book page sea. The book, the sea, and the ship are made using metal adorned with waterproof and fade-proof paper. The original book is in the public domain, and the pages are reproduced onto the specialized paper. Hand-painted glitter and Swarovski crystals give the piece a hint of magic.

Artist's statement: The concept for The Key sculpture is that everyone has a key hidden inside their heart. The key unlocks their desire to love, to learn, to give and to create. The sculpture is painted in silver and blush pink acrylic paints. The heart is hollowed out and a door projects outward. Inside the door is a key made of metal and adorned with paint and crystals to look timeless and magical. There are hearts bursting from the doorway with crystals as the key is revealed. The ribbon on the key is created from painted metal.

Directories not only show us where we are on a map, but they list other places we can visit and show how we can get there.

“You Are Here” replaces traditional directions with bold, bright and contrasting designs. The hope is that – rather than engaging in the constant rush that we all experience today- the observer will slow down and enjoy the journey: finding the subtleties in surrounding sights, sounds and activities that will enhance their experience…a reminder to be in the moment.

Artist's statement: One hundred and fifty years ago, pioneers to Nebraska were greeted by something the indigenous peoples of the state already enjoyed, prairie wildflowers. Many of those same plants can still be found in parks, roadsides, farmlands and hiking trails today. I mark the passing of the seasons by the appearance of some of my favorite Nebraska wildflowers as we travel across the state. A few that I look for are the Blue Flag Iris, the Prairie Rose, the Black-eyed Susan and the Purple Poppy Mallow and they are always there, growing by the road in the same place every year. In my own garden I grow some of these same flowers that I imagine were picked for a bouquet by the women who lived here long before me. Time passes but some things connect us to the past and hold a promise to be there in the future. In my heart it is the Nebraska wildflower.

Patron: Kay and Lee Rockwell- Learning never ceases. In memory of our parents and their commitment to education.

Artist's statement: The concept for the sculpture Blank canvas is that we have a choice every day how we write our story. The words we choose to tell ourselves and the ones we project onto others. The piece is painted and primed in white acrylic paint. The words are written clearly and powerfully in black fade-proof ink. The words are written to emulate the shape of the heart on both sides. Each word is chosen to empower the human spirit…with the word “love” being the only word repeated. The calligraphy pen is created out of metal and in the slanted position to let the audience realize they are the authors of the words they choose. The ink is painted and then covered in black glitter to show that words possess power and the magic to change perspective.

Artist's statement: This Nebraska Heart will have a boy mannequin setting on it, holding a fishing pole hoping to catch something for supper! Little does he know what’s under the water waiting for him to catch!

These fish have been developed over several years from a challenge I gave myself to learn to draw fish. Since this all began, I have filled up seven sketchbooks, designed adult coloring books and color posters. They (the fish) have a constant presence in my life. New creative ideas swim in my head and then my imagination overflows with more and more fish!

Artist's statement: This Nebraska Heart represents our beautiful Nebraska sunrises and sunsets. I chose mosaic dots (skittle like) to help make the design more dynamic. This will help to visualize all the beautiful colors we take for granted every day! Our Nebraska landscape helps us to see the vastness of the rising and setting of our sun. In the foreground are the fields of corn.

Artist's statement: This design serves as a companion to a 2015 design for ILLUMINATING LINCOLN, House of Alternating Current – a sculpture now owned by Lincoln Electric System. In similar fashion, this strictly black-and-white design is an exercise of improvisation within limits. Electrical symbols are scattered throughout the surface, the architecture between them suggesting a power grid that connects the symbols conceptually. Black rectangles occur at balanced intervals, representing the paddles of the defibrillator. Electricity has long been an ongoing theme in my work, and when finished this sculpture will be another electrical field, emanating separately as a unique object but also humming along with my larger body of work.

Artist's statement: This Nebraska Heart represents the Nebraska landscape from the beginning of time to present day. From the plowed fields, to the Capitol building. We all recognize familiar places and landscapes, like Chimney Rock, windmills and the State Fair. Nebraska is a wonderful place to live and if you don’t like weather, stick around it will change!

 Beautiful Nebraska, Peaceful prairie land, Laced with the many rivers and the hills of sand. -- Jim Fras, 1960

Patrons: Paige Duncan, Missy Hasselbalch, Megan Davidson, Shelia Schulke, Mary Ebers, Suzanne Sughroue & Sarah Gervais

Artist's statement: You know you’ve earned your stripes as a mother if your child gets a MOM tattoo heart!I love all types of art, but especially tattoos.  They’re the deepest personal reflection of who a person really is.  They can depict struggles, loves, interests, experiences, etc.  The subject matter is endless!I know if I were driving somewhere and saw this giant MOM tattoo heart, it would bring a smile to my face, and give my own heart as a mom a warm feeling.

Artist's statement: When creating this heart my vision was to have each side of the heart representing a different emotion; whether it’s from the same person or two different people. The idea is that the underlying emotions can be merged together and co-exist with one another, even the deepest emotions that may never come to the surface.

Artists' statement: The essence of this design is that each County in Nebraska, would be represented by a unique ceramic heart. A sample of one of these hearts is attached to the board. All 93 hearts would be made with a variety of textures and a variety of color, the result where they are all beautiful but not the same.

Artist's statement: The inspiration for Plane and Plains comes from my parents. My Father loved flying and served in WWII, where he went to Hiroshima after the blast. When I was a child, he flew a little two seat Aeronca Champ that he always called “The Champ”. As a teenager, we travelled all over Nebraska to visit friends and family in a Cessna 172. My Mother is a seamstress and quilter. The Nebraska surface and fields from above always make me think of patchwork quilts.

Artist's statement: My inspiration for this work began with a design created within the heart shape. I then thought to portray water and I realized that I could feature four elements, with two on each side. I enjoy patterns and added the white detail to enhance a rhythmic flow of textures for each element. The white also brings a unity to the two side and all four differing ideas.

Artist's statement: Anyone who has adopted a pet knows that look – the one that pleads with us, “Take me home”; the one that says “Yes, it’s me, I am the one”! And “I promise to be loyal and love you unconditionally”. The bond between pets and their humans is one that stands the test of time. Their pawprints are forever imprinted on our hearts. This design celebrates 2 beloved pets, and the connection we have with them. In the style of Pop Art, the colors are designed to grab your attention while paying homage to a simple subject.

Artist's statement: How can we describe everything nice in Nebraska? Ways we can do it are by painting, illustrating and telling stories about it. We have crops, wildlife, open skies, livestock, fields of flowers, antiques education, settlers and much more. Peasant hard working communities or individual scenes on the farm can be colorful, interesting and amusing. All nice things about Nebraska can combine to make a pretty and colorful image. A person will have to stop and take time to view everything nice in Nebraska.

Artist's statement: Kintsugi is a Japanese term that means “to repair with gold”, and is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with lacquer mixed with gold. Rather than throwing an object away when it is broken, the object is repaired and made stronger, more beautiful, and more valuable. Together with my good friend Michael Leach, who is a practicing therapist, we have taken this concept one step further, and applied it to the human heart. A heart that has been broken through whatever means – love, loss, death, abuse, war, natural disasters, etc. – can be healed, and the person can be stronger, more beautiful and more valuable for the experience. This concept seems particularly appropriate for Nebraska, often considered the heart of America.

I could not have created this heart without the support of my family and friends. A special thank you goes out to Adrian Smith, Morrill Elementary School, all the members of the Sakurada family, and my daughter, Kristin Sakurada Hotz. I sincerely hope you enjoy this piece that I have tried to create.

Artist's statement: The art on this heart truly comes from mine! The barn image is that from my family’s farm which we sold a couple years ago when my parents retired. I spent many a day working, playing and daydreaming in this barn. I know that someday it may no longer exist, so I wanted to capture its image, permanently, for others to also enjoy.

Artist's statement: The people and things that melt my heart are here, in the heart of our nation, Nebraska.

As a teen, I worked at Silver Dollar City in Branson Missouri. Those summers affirmed my penchant for the arts in countless ways. I played the dulcimer in a gazebo in the park, but I was drawn to the glass blowing shop to watch the glass blowers create. As an adult, my fascination with glass blowing continued through the work of Dale Chihuly. I am drawn to the free form shapes, the vivid color and the random and amazing ways glass comes to life.

The prevalence of recyclable plastic prompted me to research and implement the fabrication of plastic art. I find it compelling to take the discarded, the ordinary, and mold it into something quite different and unexpected.

Melting H’Art is an expression of the melting pot of personalities, cultures and the unique way of life found in each county within our state. Every piece of plastic art is different. If you look closely, you will find the letters of the alphabet tucked through out the structure. Search for the first letter of your name, or maybe your hometown. When you find it, know that you are a part of Melting H’Art too. Art is at it’s best when it is shared.

Artist's statement: My proposal would be two sided with corn painted on both sides. One side depicts moonlit cornfield and the other side shows the golden hour when the sun is shining through the corn. I chose to paint corn for this project because corn represents agriculture and agriculture is vital to Nebraska. This symbol is so important to our state that the University chose it as their mascot – and what better symbol would there be to place on campus for a public art display? When I paint I use a multitude of colors. For inspiration I stand in a cornfield and listen to the rustling of the leaves, as the sun slowly sinks to the horizon changing the colors constantly before it’s gone. This intense imagery experience provides me as an artist with feelings I can only express through my work. I grew up in Valley County, Nebraska on a farm and I’ve been painting most of my life. In the past five years I’ve concentrated on painting corn and other aspects of Nebraska agriculture.

Artist's statement: “Love is a powerful source." These words were spoken to me the other day by my oncologist and have echoed in my ears continuously since. One act of love, one gesture, one spoken word can inspire another act of love and this ripple effect has unimaginable power to change a moment.

I moved back to Lincoln, NE one year ago after undergoing treatment for stage 3 breast cancer. I grew up in Grant, NE (Perkins County) and lived there for 17 years before moving to Los Angeles where I lived for 18 years. Both places are home, but Nebraska also has a big piece of my heart.

A few weeks ago I was diagnosed with a relapse of metastatic breast cancer. This is an unimaginable diagnosis and although there is sorrow, what stands out is the love of so many people that has given me strength in this moment. “Possibility” is a love letter and a thank you to all of the people in Nebraska who have been part of my journey. The wonderful thing about love is that it never runs out. There is always more. And not only am I blessed by acts of love, but I can also bless. Love is not only for me to receive, but for me to freely give.

“Possibility” begins with a system inspired by a song like many of my paintings. This system is played out in diamond shapes that expand and contract across the surface of the heart. Each color is hand-mixed so that no two diamonds are exactly the same hue. Each is unique. This particular piece is made up of shades of blue that recall the large, open skies that Nebraska i known for. The placement of each diamond is contingent upon the one placed before so that the final composition would not be possible without each piece, without each act of love.

From our vantage point, we may not always see how one moment impacts another, but when we are given a chance to step back and view the larger picture, we can often see astonishing beauty woven through our lives, through our grief, our pain and our joy.

It is my hope that others who view “Possibility” are filled with a renewed sense of hope and that their despair is replaced by possibility.

Artist's statement: “Love is a powerful source." These words were spoken to me the other day by my oncologist and have echoed in my ears continuously since. One act of love, one gesture, one spoken word can inspire another act of love and this ripple effect has unimaginable power to change a moment.

I moved back to Lincoln, NE one year ago after undergoing treatment for stage 3 breast cancer. I grew up in Grant, NE (Perkins County) and lived there for 17 years before moving to Los Angeles where I lived for 18 years. Both places are home, but Nebraska also has a big piece of my heart.

A few weeks ago I was diagnosed with a relapse of metastatic breast cancer. This is an unimaginable diagnosis and although there is sorrow, what stands out is the love of so many people that has given me strength in this moment. “If I Was… is a love letter and a thank you to all of the people in Nebraska who have been part of my journey. The wonderful thing about love is that it never runs out. There is always more. And not only am I blessed by acts of love, but I can also bless. Love is not only for me to receive, but for me to freely give.

“If I Was…” begins with a system inspired by a song like many of my paintings. This system is played out in diamond shapes that expand and contract across the surface of the heart. Each color is hand-mixed so that no two diamonds are exactly the same hue. Each is unique. This particular piece is made up of shades of blue that recall the large, open skies that Nebraska i known for. The placement of each diamond is contingent upon the one placed before so that the final composition would not be possible without each piece, without each act of love.

From our vantage point, we may not always see how one moment impacts another, but when we are given a chance to step back and view the larger picture, we can often see astonishing beauty woven through our lives, through our grief, our pain and our joy.

I hope that others who view “If I Was…” are filled with an awareness of the powerful love that is there to meet them in each and every moment.

Artist's statement: Lately mosaics have been my medium of choice and I’ve developed a style all my own. I have incorporated shells, rocks, jewelry, hardware, buttons and wood using them with the usual broken plates and mosaic tiles. I would like to make a 3-D mosaic using the same materials as my 2-D mosaics. There will be an abstract, organic feel on the sculptured Heart, which will give a rich, textured feel. (It will be so cool!)

The grout and super burly glue would make it almost impossible to remove any of the pieces from the heart. They will be anchored permanently to the fiberglass form1

Ever since I did the lightbulb in mosaic tiles, I’ve wanted to take what I learned from that project and make another 3-D sculpture! The heart is perfect! To use additional materials (besides just tiles) will add interest and depth to the sculpture. I also would like to make it more colorful and eye-catching!

Much of my inspiration comes from putting to use what I learned from the Light Bulb! You don’t always get a chance for “do-overs”!

Artist's statement: In Scripture, 1st Corinthians 13:13 says “Now faith, hope and love, these three, but the greatest of these is love”.

I think our whole country needs to love more! We’re a mess! I have been inspired to remind people, using the heart as a canvas, how important it is to love one another! Hopefully the shiny surface of the heart covered in tile will remind people what is important – to share God’s love with one another!

Artist's statement: The title for this Proposal is “Beauty” as it focuses on the butterfly and flowers – nature’s artwork – the ‘beauty’ in our world.

Discovering early in my childhood that my bedroom walls provided a great canvas for my crayon creations, also provided great motivation for my mother to channel my artistic flair and get me involved in more appropriate artistic outlets. She made sure I was introduced to a number of community-based day camps, girl scouts, needlework classes…any opportunity to keep my focus off her walls! These formative lessons developed in me, a “See it, like it, create it “ life model. I’ve always believed that I can do anything if I put effort into it. This attitude has served me well through the years, developing skills in varied and diverse art experiences and modalities.

Working as a postal carrier for 30+ years (now retired) allowed me to see nature in all seasons, any weather situation that you can encounter, along with the color changes as the sun moved across the sky. Much of my art takes on the shapes, colors, shadows and images still painted in my mind from my travels through Lincoln’s landscapes.

My passion and love of art, a culmination of life experiences, my bold and very independent personality, and gravitation toward bold, unique (and sometimes brazen) color combinations all contribute to the work I produce.

My Mom would be so proud! My artistic work has led me back to my crayons. By developing a style and technique of melting and blending crayons, I create a one-of-a-kind, unique piece of art that captures my mood and personality, that hopefully visually delights art enthusiasts who view my work.

Art is a very stabilizing force in my life. I can begin working and get so totally immersed in the work that I lose all track of time. Art is calming and helps me relax; visualize as the crayons melt, blend and dance on the canvas, the stress leaves and relaxation enters.

I hope my work is visually appealing and draws you in. As an artist, my hope is that through my enjoyment of creating the work, it has a ripple effect in positively impacting those who view it.

Artist's statement: The idea of this design stemmed from the belief that people come into one’s life for a reason, even if only for a season. As an art educator, I have had many students cross my path. It is my hope that when students crossed my path, their lives were enriched by the experience of art that I facilitated.

There are more students who have crossed my path than I can possibly count, but each of them have left a mark on my heart, proved the powerful effects of art, and reminded me that I am living out my favorite quote by Robert Henri. “The object isn’t to make art, it’s to be in that wonderful state which makes are inevitable”.

Artist's statement: Inspired by the iconic butterfly species commonly known as “monarch” (Danaus plexippus), which is in serious decline due to multiple threats including; widespread use of glyphosate herbicides and neonicotinoids insecticides, cutting of the fir forests, and drought associated with climate change. Monarchs undertake a migration of epic proportions that spans Canada, the United States and Mexico, and Nebraska lies in this very important travel corridor. It is important that the public become aware of the impact we have on these beautiful creatures, and take action to have positive impacts rather than negative.

Artist's statement: A playful moment when a kitten pounces on its favorite pink toy becomes a lifelong, lasting memory. Quirky behavior laced with affection has an unexpected way of comforting our souls and touching our lives. Whether in the joy of the here and now, or in photographic memories of the past, our pets always have a special place in our heart and mind.

This design is dedicated to my favorite cat, Paloma. Ours is a true story of bonding, joy and inspiration.

Artist's statement: The wondrous, magical beauty of nature always inspires me. From a seed to germination I nurture and care for the plant as I watch it grow through various stages. Before long, the seedling has emerged into a well-established plant that soon will bear all of its glory. Strong and tall my plant has emerged with vibrant and bold petals; a flower that now tracks the sun across the sky with its gentle sway. The plant shall give forth its fruit and the cycle of life shall begin again with a seed. Inspirational thoughts start much the same way. Like the seed, with some nurturing care, effort and time, creative endeavors too may turn into something quite wonderful.

Patron: Sysco Lincoln, Eileen Bradbury & Randy Pierce, Bob & Carla Philipps, Roy Lamb and Ron Bradbury

Artist's statement: Nebraska loves “gearheads” and so do I! The talented men in my life love to take things apart, examine how they work, and put them back together again. Many consultations have occurred in the garage and under the hood. Many words of advice have passed over the phone, “how do I make this work again? What is my next step?”Their community and support of each other has created a strong bond that will never be broken.

My family appreciates the experience and knowledge of each other. They depend on it; much like Nebraska. We are surrounded by incredible talent, knowledge, strength and compassion. We come together and make big things happen. The gears may not always turn just right; they may need a little adjusting and repair. But that’s how we learn and how we become stronger. “Together we can do so much.” This quote by Helen Keller is a tribute to the ‘gearheads’ in my life and in the great state of Nebraska.

Artist's statement: Storytime has been one of my earliest and most cherished memories! As a child, my family would read to me. We would explore vast and beautiful vistas of imagination. Our family dog, Brandy, would often join in the circle. It was a wonderful time of love, learning and mentoring. We often would read about history. When we read to children, we reveal history to them. We also continue writing the story into the future. I wonder what chapters they will add as the years go by.

Made of meticulously hand cast bronze, Heartland Story is a tour de force in bronze storytelling. The group of bronze busts are life sized! Of note, my illustrations are not exact to scale. The group will be attached to the painted fiberglass heart with a large circle. Bronze is the pinnacle of traditional artwork. It is extreme in quality and durability , and makes a bold statement to that effect.

I have the privilege of having been entrusted with many monumental artworks nationally and internationally. In my journeys, I have seen work in this genre serve as a link to the past and a bridge to the future.

Artist's statement: Made of bronze, and applied to the dramatically painted heart, Immaculate Heartland is an expression of devotion. The fiberglass heart of Mother Mary wears a bronze crown and flame. The crown wraps around the mid-section of the heart on both sides. Multi-colored flowers adorn her crown. It is a dramatic and powerful statement of a mother’s sorrow and victory dedicated to mother’s everywhere.

Mary travels in the same deep waters of our minds and relationships that art does. She speaks volumes to us on a simple emotional and instinctive level that bypasses the stereotypical banter. We all recognize the love in our mother’s voices.

I have the privilege of having been entrusted with many monument artworks nationally and internationally. In my journeys, I have seen work in this genre serve as a line to the past and a bridge to the future.

Artist's statement: I titled this design “Heartfelt Words” and plan to do the design in a rainbow. The word heartfelt means something that is sincerely and deeply felt. Rainbows are a symbol of hope – they speak to our heart and soul bringing the promise of new beginnings. The words are powerful word that speak to the heart and each of us would be better if we followed.

Artist's statement: My painting is a narrative that invites us to look beyond the surface and discover the interpretation and eloquence of light and living elements. The painting gives a pictorial voice that represents the environmental narrative that exemplifies everything good about Nebraska life. This inspiration is found in my Koi pond of 17 years in my backyard.

Artist's statement: When a person thinks of Nebraska, two things come to mind. The first is Husker football and the second is fields of corn, as far as the eye can see. For this design, I was inspired by this second thought. Corn is the heart of Nebraska/ From the middle to the outskirts, it’s everywhere and only seemed fitting to include it in this design.

Another quality of Nebraska I wanted to include was the many rivers that we have. Many people find peace and tranquility by rivers; and hopefully people can find the same peace when viewing this sculpture.

Artist: Abby Olson for the Broken Bow Art Club, under the direction of Roberta Barnes, Broken Bow art teacher

Artist's statement: During the pioneer settlement of Nebraska, homesteaders learned how to “make do” with what they had. The women of the family would take scraps of cloth and cut them apart to make quilts.

This Nebraska heart depicts many aspects of the patchwork quilt. Patchwork quilts show many colors and patterns. Also this “patchwork” quilt shows many different types of quilt block patterns used to create pieced quilts.

Artists' statement: Solomon Butcher is a prominent figure in the history of Custer County. His dream was to record, through his photography, the life of the early homesteaders in the late 1800’s. Now, a century later, his images give us an insight into the struggles, accomplishments, hopes and dreams of the settlers. Without his photographs, we would have little understanding of the extremes those early settlers endured.

Our heart depicts the history of Butcher in a dream-like cloudscape. The unchanging prairie is depicted in the lower portion of the heart, with the history of the settlers materializing within the clouds.

The base of the sculpture will map out the many towns and villages that existed in Custer County at the time that Solomon Bu`tcher was photographing the settlers.

*All of the Solomon Butcher images that were referenced for the piece were cleared for use through the Nebraska Historical Society.

Artist's statement: The inspiration for this project was threefold – Nebraska’s 150th birthday, the sponsoring groups, and a love of quilting.

The quilt pattern chosen for one side of the heart is a traditional log cabin pattern. Quilters are told that it represents log cabins built on the prairie with red center squares for the hearth. The light values of the block are for the sunny side of the house, the dark values on the opposite side are the shady side of the house.

Quilts were often made with treasured fabric, some hand woven, some salvaged from used pieces of clothing. Pioneer families traveling on the Overland and Oregon Trails often chose to include quilts in the belongings they brought along for the journey, bring comfort to those who lay beneath them.

The second design is a quilted mosaic, many pieces that come together to make a whole. When viewing photo mosaics, the subject becomes clear when viewed from afar. The mosaic represents a welcoming pet, cared for in a loving home.

As with quilting bees, homes with family atmospheres for adolescents, and pet owners seeking help for their pets, close associations with others are so vital for healthy lives. This project represents the joy and contentment that comes from being a part of a loving home, as the quilt block represents.

Artists' statement: This piece is symbolizing that any women, regardless of size, race, religion, or age, can do any career that she wants to do (even if that job is normally done by a male). All of the jobs displayed in this heart show compassion. Some are easier to relate to than others, like the nurse and mother. Yet, the police and army dispatcher also show compassion through different aspects than usually thought. The faces in this piece will remain blank(other than the lips) so that any woman, young or old, can picture herself doing one of these jobs or anything else she would like. The main goal of this piece is to inspire – not just women, but society – to break down the stereotypical walls we built so high and allow everyone to dream big and hope to become whatever they wish.

For the bottom, where the heart comes to a tip, it will have a little girl looking up as if she is dreaming of all the things she could become. For the base, it will look like roots showing that these jobs flow from and to all areas of Nebraska.

Artist's statement: This piece celebrates the richness of Nebraska’s natural resources. Even though they aren’t diamonds, they’re just as precious. I appreciate the fact that this project benefits resources in the state that reach out to those who are in need such as the Boys Hope and Girls Hope organization and The Sadie Dog Fund. I hope this project benefits these two in many ways. When art transcends the beauty of a piece to benefit the greater good of the community, it’s a win-win for everyone!

I’ve come to believe that what a person sees depends on what they’re looking for. Nebraska often gets a bad rap as being a boring state with “nothing to do.” Ask any teenager who has grown up here and many will echo that sentiment. At least I know I used to think that way, having grown up here; but I’ve come to see the richness and beauty of resources in this state.

When I started thinking about this project and the idea that it is celebrating Nebraska’s statehood, I found myself repeatedly returning to this idea of the state often being underappreciated. It seemed to me the state is like a diamond in the rough. The state has grown and progressed in so many ways in 150 years of statehood; and yet there is still more untapped potential. Part of that potential depends on how we take care of the natural resources we have.

Artist's statement: I have always been inspired by the beauty of the Nebraska landscape. My work encompasses this in many forms. Within the last year, I was chosen to depict the Nebraska landscape and sky in fused glass plates to be given to 108 nations around the world representing our beautiful state. Being able to represent the land on the heart form makes this project very near and dear to me. The land and sky are ever changing and I wanted the viewer to be able to see this movement in the piece and the contrast of the acrylic painting and the glass.

The amazing beauty of the Nebraska landscape and sky are created by using glass frit in combination with acrylic paint. Two of my favorite forms of art.

The fused glass method of art is creating by layering small particles of glass, much like the consistency of sand on a clear base of fusible glass. Custom blended frits are created by the combination and experimentation of the available colors of fusible glass. Because of the scientific composition of glass being made with heavy metals, some of these custom colors react when fired, creating totally new colorations. These combinations of colors are significant in creating the clouds and depths of color. There are approximately 50 custom color combinations in this piece. With the landscape and clouds, the use of medium size colored frit was also used to imply heavier or denser coloration.

It is important to note that the use of a clear background glass lets the light transmit through the pieces of glass and can be viewed from both sides. The piece is fired to full fuse. Full fused kiln-forming technique relies on the glass being heated hot enough to become one piece of glass to a temperature of 1450 degrees Fahrenheit and then cooled.

Using acrylic paint shows the difference of composition in the landscape forms giving them more detail.

Artist's statement: The sky in the Great Plains allows one to see a storm roll in for miles, the pink clouds giving the proper salutations upon the arrival and departure of the day’s guest of honor, and a temperamental ocean. The sea below is nearly always calm, busy and brimming with life between the mountains. Through it all, the song of the Meadowlark.

Artist's statement: My inspiration for this piece comes from my own history as the only Nebraskan in my family tree.

in California, Virginia, Kansas, and Missouri. As the years went by, Nebraska remained a refuge…a temporary resting place for celebrating holidays, healing a broken heart, or making plans for my future. But after having my first child the desire for a smaller community, running into familiar faces, and the proximity to my parents became unavoidable. Now I live here in a neighborhood I once coveted, one where I can walk our children to school, the local grocery cashiers know my name, there is a park full of kids across the street, and neighbors who offer help at a moment’s notice. Before, I was just born here. Now, it is home.

The heart will be painted in 10-15 varying jewel toned shades acrylic paint. In each of the 93 blocks of color (half on the back, half on the front), names of all the counties of Nebraska will be hand lettered in black in different fonts. The base can remain white or the sponsor can help choose a color from those used on the heart. The entire heart will be sprayed with a clear protective coating.

Artist's statement: I wanted to design something that would pay homage to the Ferment sculpture at the Nelson Atkins Museum in Kansas City. My father is a retired sheet metal worker. During my childhood, he, my brother and I spent many days playing with pop-rivets. We would rivet random pieces of scrap metal together, and I wanted to pay homage to that as well.

Artist's statement: My inspiration for this sculpture is the Serengeti of Africa. The sunsets, with the trees and animals as silhouettes, are amazing. Because I live in Omaha, Nebraska, I am able to go to the finest Zoo in the world. The Henry Doorly Zoo that is. I am able to see the animals of the Serengeti. My three girls and I have always liked to see the elephants and giraffes. So they became an obvious choice for this sculpture. I chose the Desert Dome of the Henry Doorly Zoo as my backdrop. I have seen the sunset behind the Desert Dome and chose to encapsulate a Serengeti sunset inside my design. The heart will have the look of the Desert Dome with all of its triangles. The sculpture will have the feel of Africa.

Artist's statement: I was fortunate to see the sandhill crane migration at sunset a number of years ago. It was a magnificent sight. This sculpture screams Nebraska. I chose to do a sunset for the heart. The cranes will be made from metal and painted black to give a silhouette look to the piece. They will have a two-dimensional look to them. They will be affixed to the sculpture to give the appearance of flying away from the heart.

Artist's statement: Heart and home are inseparable. For me, that means Nebraska and the beautiful, life-giving trees that grow so easily here.

My life is a stormy tale I did not write but always wanted to . In the 1970’s, I defected from Romania, and I have since become a new person, more than once. I have traveled the world, reinvented myself and grew new branches; but I set down roots again and again in this fertile soil.

I am a great-grandmother now, and I cherish the thought of encouraging all young Nebraskans to grow, to be educated and become the best they can ever be.

I based my design on the Cottonwood, and just like a tree that tries to find new sources of water and grow where it is planted, so should children from all of Nebraska’s diverse backgrounds be encouraged to get an education, remain connected and respectful of each other’s traditions. I hope in this way they will lead the future, with a heart.

Artist's statement: My inspiration for this is drawn from the fact that Nebraska is not just nice, it is the Good Life because we are people who respect one another. We embrace people of differing faiths, beliefs and cultures. We understand and practice freedom daily through tolerance and love, recognizing that though many, we are one. The final Heart art will be a mosaic. It represents the concept of how each individual and different tile is so much greater when joined by the other mosaic pieces to create a masterpiece.

Artist's statement: The proposed design for this Nebraska by Heart was inspired by the work of photographer Michael Forsberg. Forsberg’s book, On Ancient Wings, details the migration of the sandhill cranes of North America. Their annual stop along the Platte River is, according to Forsberg, the largest gathering of any crane species anywhere in the world.

For a few weeks every late winter/early spring, the cranes call Nebraska home. The cranes use their time here to replenish their bodies and to rest before continuing their journey north. The wild beauty of the cranes continues to inspire the thousands of Nebraska residents and tourists from around the world who come to view them every year.

This design illustrates a facet of Nebraska that is older than 150 years. Cranes have migrated along the Platte River for a millennia. They will be here, year after year, long after we have gone. Our witness to the migration of the sandhill cranes binds us to view them every year.

Artist's statement: Patriotism has been an integral part of my life since I was a small child, partially influenced by my father’s military experience in World War II. My parents, along with my Girl Scout experience, combined to generate a sense of pride and national service. My husband, a Veteran of the U.S. Navy (Vietnam – era), and I have played integral roles in numerous Heartland Honor Flights organized by Bill and Evonne Williams (Patriotic Productions) of Omaha. It was truly an honor for me to coordinate the “Home Front” local activities as well as participate in the flights themselves, in the company of our heroic Veterans. Along with my pride of country, is my pride of State, the nation’s 37th State.

Artist's statement: From a gentle breeze to a cow-tipping gale, the wind is a ubiquitous presence in Nebraska. For eons that wind pollinated the grasses of the rolling prairies. Today that wind powers the grand turbines creating clean and renewable power. Wind is an experience that ever Nebraskan knows.

I love to listen to the music of nature that arises when the Nebraska wind comes up. Out on the prairie you can hear the grasses rustle as they roll like ocean waves. In summer, the breezes make the corn fields rattle and clatter. When the storm winds rush across the plains, the trees moan and sway to that fierce music. My Nebraska By Heart piece entitled “The Music of the Wind” is inspired by and evokes that kind of music.

Artist's statement: I remember the first time I stood atop Scotts Bluff. The ranger on duty told us that when our pioneer ancestors reached this point, they had accomplished one third of their journey. I looked all around at the vista from the top of the bluff. It is now surrounded by parceled farm land, but I could imagine the rolling hills of grasses that those pioneers had to cross to make their sojourn. In those days, the grasses grew taller than the wagon wheels and often the heads of the people.

The tallgrass prairie was a unique ecosystem of the Great Plains. It ranged from Canada to Northern Texas, with Nebraska at its heart. It was home to a wide variety of wildlife; birds, gophers, badgers, even bears and bison. It became home to the adventurous of heart who homesteaded and settled on the prairie. I can still imagine the oceans of tall grass surrounding those lonely travelers, making waves across the horizon.

Artist's statement: The weather has always been an integral part of Nebraska life. Its ability to swing from beautiful to extremely violent has always influenced crops, cattle, fortune and failure. This heart is a depiction of a winter storm seen from hundreds of feet above the ground or out of an airplane window as it passes overhead.

Artist's statement: The meaning of my design is a picture I think of when I hear the word Army. I always think not the best when I hear that word, mostly because of my family, and most all died. It will be the same front and back.

Artist's statement: The plan for Metamorphosis would be to turn the heart onto its side, and use additional plastic molding materials to build out a toad, using the heart shape as a base. The toad would be composed of both natural and non-natural materials and will be definitely built in conjunction with 5-17 year old youth at The Bay. The project will include an exploration of materials, using entirely found objects to create texture and pattern.

Toads are native to Nebraska, but also they are sort of delightfully imperfect forms, something you don’t associate with love which if often thought of in an idealized form. Love, real love, is gritty, dirty, and tough. Loving someone day in and day out, is not easy. Loving ourselves day in and day out isn’t easy. Love is messy, and dirty, and also delightfully, incredibly wonderful.

I may be unknown to some of you. I am not a traditional artist. I am 26 and I am not certain what I am. I am determined to tell you some essential pieces of me, and convince you that I will do well by this giant, wonderful piece of heart-shaped plastic.

I am from Lincoln. I went to Boston for college and moved back to Lincoln two years ago. Since I’ve been back I have dove into the “tech world” working at tech startups in the downtown area, teaching coding to girls at Park Middle School, and working with Arts and Humanities students doing community art projects.

I am very interested in the intersection of art and technology. I recently completed a 50 foot crocodile at Turbine Flats. It was a project that I dreamed up and worked on last winter, for fun. I had open studio days every Saturday where I invited kids from the neighborhood to come and build (and play) with me. All the materials were found objects, and the crocodile also incorporated technology in the form of a Bare Conductive Chip, which accepts inputs (much like a midi-controller).

I love primarily to build things with people. I have begun conversations with The Bay, and intend to build the heart together with young people. The crocodile was my most recent, formal collective art-making endeavor.

I am involved in a number of different initiatives in Lincoln. I am a docent at Sheldon and and I hope you will check out my website, www.gretch.in and consider me for this wonderful, exciting opportunity to build something with people – and to have some support in that important effort!

Artist's statement: “If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, excitement, and mystery of the world we live in.” – Rachel Carson

The monarch butterfly has been migrating through Nebraska for thousands of years. For me, the monarch represents an enduring promise that next year, and for many years to come, this magnificent winged creature will return to Nebraska to inspire a sense of wonder, and appreciation for nature’s beauty, but most of all, hope for the future.

“Written on the Wings of the Monarch” will reflect the hope that for many generations to come, children and adults alike will explore and contemplate the beauty of our earth together, keeping alive that inborn sense of wonder. By doing so, we will care deeply for it. This piece will also honor the many generations of Nebraskans who have made our state a reflection of what we value more than anything, our rich tapestry of people.

Artist's statement: Many Nebraskans are aware of our state flower, the Goldenrod, and state bird, the Western Meadowlark, but fewer are aware of Nebraska’s state insect, the Honeybee. This piece gives tribute to the Honeybee, while playing with its shape to mimic the heart.

Artist's statement: The last three years have been a roller coaster for myself and my family. After leaving a job in education which I held for nine years, my family had the choice of moving to New York (where I had a few job offers) or staying here in Nebraska where our family lives. I have been here 15 years, after meeting my wife in school in NY and deciding to relocate to Omaha where my wife and her family live. The roller coaster ride continued recently after I suffered a stroke. Although there were few if any complications, I realized that rather than pursuing the career I was striving for in education, I wanted to go back to my first love and inspiration – art. My experience in theatre and teaching theatre will enable this project to be carried out properly and in a timely manner.

My inspirations for the five renderings which I am submitting are based on some of the values I cherish and encounter every day as a resident of Nebraska. I also consider myself an amateur historian and I was intrigued by Nebraska’s anniversary, the project and helping others. Overall, the symbol of a heart with an arrow through it represents love but also a “broken heart”. The arrow symbolizes the American Indian and how their lands were taken away. We must all fight for our freedom. The sky behind the silhouettes represents either a dusk or a dawn. While some of our beliefs change (dusk), those that adapt to change survive (dawn).

Artist's statement: My inspiration for a rainbow and rain and sunshine is my 6 year old granddaughter Cayla Jo. She was born when I was 60 and retired. I was in my own little world , then she came along. I babysat with her 45 hours a week from the time her mom went back to work until kindergarten. It had been a long time since I rocked a baby to sleep, sang lullabies, read children’s books and had tea parties. She opened my eyes to a whole new world that I had not been a part of. We had one son, so a little girl who is funny, smart and had a wonderful imagination kept me on my toes and I saw through her eyes the joy of walking in rain puddles, jumping rope, princess dress up and “I get to be the Queen”. Now she is in first grade and it is so amazing how she absorbs so much information each day to share with me when I pick her up after school. She’s my “rainbow” rain or shine.

Artists' statement: “Even when the heart is broken, beaten, and bruised, a light of hope will always shine through”

The heart we are proposing to create is made out of polygon triangular shapes. These shapes would create the bulk of the structure and each facet would have either glass mirror or colored glass attached with epoxy or finished with grout.

The different facets of the heart represent the different facets of our state, our community and of our lives: the ways we live and work, all coming together to create a place that is at the very heart of our nation. Each fragment will be colored glass or a mirror. The mirror fragments are in response to our previous idea of taking away some of the fragments to reveal an interior light. With the addition of mirrored glass we will be using the light from outside the form to create a “light from within”.

The idea that all of us have a fragment of ourselves missing, or that many people feel broken, there is still light that can reflect from this experience and be a fragment of something greater than ourselves. The illuminating light that will be reflected from the heart’s mirrored fragments, is the light of others from without. As high school students who often feel as if we are living fragmented lives, or within a fragmented community, when all the pieces come together and we work together, life is better.

Sponsored by Jocelyn Lippincott Reiss, art specialist. Artists representing Lincoln North Star High School: Deanna Allen, Sarah Cronin, An Pham, Laila Hasan, Alexandar Rooks, Jasmine Suarez, Billy Le, Andres Novoa, Azizkhon Youldashev.

Artist's statement: Some people grew up in small communities where they could circle their home town in 5 blocks. They road bikes to the grocery store and walked across the street to get to the city pool. Some lived on farms and were raised to take care of crops and animals. Others grew up in big cities where they drove thirty minutes to get home by crossing bridges and passing downtown buildings. And if you’re like me, you grew up praising Husker Football and you couldn’t find anyone not wearing red on a Sunday in Fall. No matter which lifestyle we grew up with, we all have something in common – we are Nebraska. This place is truly incredible, and I constantly find myself being more thankful for the sense of community I’ve found in this state. When designing my proposal, I wanted to show that no matter what our backgrounds might be, we all hold Nebraska close to our hearts. Whether we’re big city living or small town folks, we all belong to the state of the two finger wave and the Cornhuskers. We’re connected in more ways than one, and I am so excited to share all of the amazing things that make up this state through this sculpture.

Artist's statement: Agriculture built and has sustained Nebraska’s economy, and with corn being so visible in the state – from the crops to the Nebraska Cornhuskers – I believe corn will keep beating strong in Nebraska in the future.

Artist's statement: Referring to King Solomon: “For the king had a fleet of ships of Tarshish at sea with fleet of Hiram. Once every three years the fleet of ships of Tarshish used to come bringing gold, silver, ivory, apes and peacocks." 1 Kings 10:22

The peacock was given to the king as an object of splendor and opulence. A gift to gain favor. The display of feathers is a glory in nature.

The shape of a heart lends itself to an image of the spreading feathers of a peacock. Each year the peacock loses the tail feathers and re-grows new feathers for the next mating season.

Art has interpreted the peacock with many different approaches. Realism to the abstract. Taking artistic license with elements of design. My approach was to bring both into the “Renewed Glory”.

Artist's statement: Born and raised in Lincoln, Jewel studied art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and obtained a Bachelors of Fine Arts Degree. Always fond of travel and the arts of different cultures she has tried many styles of art through several mediums. From Manuscripts with egg tempera and black gall ink on vellum to Australian Aboriginal dot art in acrylic on chairs to sewing clothing made from men’s neck ties, her eclectic interests keep her moving on to new ideas and new things. She enjoys many crafts, cake decorating, sewing, screen printing, molding with clay and works in many 2D mediums such as watercolor, guache, charcoal, pencil, ink, oil and acrylic. She has a great love for people so you will find them in much of her work. However, design elements are becoming more prevalent as she has recently added Czech and Native American designs to the top of her interests list. Don’t be surprised on what you see her trying next.

I’ve recently discovered the joy of dot art. I love the bright colors, detail and patterns. I find that it is loved by most from adults to children. Although tribes in Australia and Africa have been doing this style of art for hundreds of years it never seems to get dull. I’ve been dabbing for over a year and everyone seems to enjoy the designs. As for the subject, I have always been fascinated by the movement from night to day and vice versa. The movement of the moon and sun have entranced the world for thousands of years and have sparked everything from calendars for the solstice to worship as gods. As we move into my favorite season, fall, the light of sun grows shorter in our sky and as the darkness grows we know that winter approaches. It is the turn of the great wheel of life.

Patrons: Mary & Dr. Gregory Heidrick, Bob & Jan Fitzsimmons, Dr. Michael McCoy and Betsy & Dr. Jim Bobenhouse

Artist's statement: Inspiration for my Nebraska by Heart design came from the land. Nebraska is full of fertile farmland that sustains its citizens and people around the world. The base of the structure is painted in a modern representational style symbolizing the diverse fields and the rich soils of our state. The heart itself sprouts flowers of many shapes and colors so show the diversity and beauty that our state sustains. There is a great abundance of color in the Nebraska landscape. From spring to fall, if you go out into the countryside, you can see a wide variety of native flowers blooming: pasque flowers, prairie smoke, bellflower, phlox, purple coneflowers, sunflowers, butterfly weed, asters, black-eyed susan, ironweed, goldenrod, and many, many more.

I am a master gardener and teach classes about ornamental gardening and landscape design for joy of it. I love flower and also enjoy being able to share the beauty of plants with friends, family and neighbors. Painting the sculpture with flowers is another opportunity for me to share the natural beauty that Nebraska soils so easily support. Flowers are nature’s jewelry, and that is why I am titling this piece: Jewel of the Heartland.

Artist's statement: Nebraska has a great school system, with many outstanding teachers. The technology we students have available outweighs what many other places have. I’ve been inspired to use this public art project as a way to raise money for a trip to Washington DC this summer, an educational trip put together by the school system. It would be “So Sweet” to use this big art project to help me get to that great opportunity.

Artist's statement: This design is inspired by leadership, which I’ve learned a lot about from Launch Leadership, a great Nebraska organization. The baseball themed design represents a team. Great leaders create great teams. And great teams work together to knock the ball “Out of the Park."

“Love is a powerful source”.  These words were spoken to me the other day by my oncologist and have echoed in my ears continuously since.  One act of love, one gesture, one spoken word can inspire another act of love and this ripple effect has unimaginable power to change a moment.

I moved back to Lincoln, NE one year ago after undergoing treatment for stage 3 breast cancer.  I grew up in Grant, NE (Perkins County) and lived there for 17 years before moving to Los Angeles where I lived for 18 years.  Both places are home, but Nebraska also has a big piece of my heart.

A few weeks ago I was diagnosed with a relapse of metastatic breast cancer.  This is an unimaginable diagnosis and although there is sorrow, what stands out is the love of so many people that has given me strength in this moment. “Wave”… is a love letter and a thank you to all of the people in Nebraska who have been part of my journey.  The wonderful thing about love is that it never runs out.  There is always more.  And not only am I blessed by acts of love, but I can also bless.  Love is not only for me to receive, but for me to freely give.

From our vantage point, we may not always see how one moment impacts another, but when we are given a chance to step back and view the larger picture, we can often see astonishing beauty woven through our lives, through our grief, our pain and our joy.

Artist's statement: A universal depiction of struggle. Nothing in life seems worth as much if it was easy to be had. I believe this to be true.

This is my take on one of the oldest pieces of artwork. I think it will not only be cool to look at, but also very fun to create.

I will sculpt the flames and sword out of styrofoam, have them coated in fiberglass by Patrick Keogh. I will then paint the flames, sword, heart and base, clear coat it and finally wrap it in barbed wire.

Artists' statement: Bri Murphy and Katelyn Farneth are two artists who have always been interested in anatomy. This anatomical interpretation of the heart represents both of their bodies of work simultaneously, pulling from Bri’s sculptural background and Katelyn’s figurative paintings. With their ability to create a highly realistic heart they believe fellow Nebraskans will feel an internal connection to the work and the artists. The heart after all, is the driving force of the body as artists are the innovating force of society.

Artist's statement: “A dog doesn’t care if you’re rich or poor, smart or dumb. Give him your heart…and he’ll give you his." — Milo Gathema

I believe that having a dog around enriches and colors your life. The paw prints are the actual prints from dogs from my family and friends. They are the dogs that I know and love, including my two beloved dogs, Libby and Joey. What better symbol of our love for dogs than a giant heart.

Artist's statement: “In a state of grace, the soul is like a well of transparent water, from which flow only streams of clearest crystal. Its works are pleasing both to God and man, rising from the River of Life, beside which it is rooted like a tree." -- Saint Teresa of Avila

Saint Teresa’s quote was inspiration for “Spirits of the Heartland”. The application of human faces (souls) to the sculpture inscribes the River of Life and reminds us of the pioneers and Native Americans who lived, farmed and settled in Nebraska. Though physical no longer with us, their souls remain in a state of grace and their heritage lends a spiritual connection to the heart shape. The overall design and flow of organic lines (winding tree limbs, river streams) creates a visual of human souls connected and rooted like a tree to this great state of Nebraska.

I am rooted as well, born and raised in Nebraska, I will never leave and I too, will be buried among the Spirits of the Heartland.

Artist's statement: The inspiration for this design comes from the beauty of nature. I selected Nebraska’s state bird the meadowlark and wildflowers native to Nebraska. On a larger scale I would create more varieties of flowers and bright colors. The leaves and vines create a path of movement to help unify the design. The feather motif is repeated on the other side of the heart forming wing encompassing the heart shape. A skeleton key is often incorporated into my work. The key can represent different things to different people. It has an element of mystery about it,wondering what is behind each new door that opens up throughout life. In this case it was intended to honor the past and represent personal identity.The idea of loving the beauty of nature in our state and finding a place to grow, thrive, and call home. The nest represents home and unifies the bird idea shown on the front of the heart.

Artist's statement: The inspiration for my design was to link the past to the present by depicting images from across the state. The wide-open spaces of Western Nebraska represent the days of early settlers and pioneers heading west.I selected my hometown, North Platte, for the central images such as Buffalo Bill Cody’s house at Scouts Rest Ranch with a lasso roping the wind to capture the spirit of the old west. I included the railroad Bailey Yards is the largest railroad classification yard in the world leading to economic growth across the nation. The playful arrangement of tracks create a path of movement for the eye to follow throughout the design. Sandhill Cranes fly overhead during yearly migration to central Nebraska. Ears of corn symbolize the importance of agriculture in our state. The backside focuses on icons of Eastern Nebraska such as the state capital building. The circular design is my interpretation of looking up through the dome at all the beautiful art deco era designs throughout the building. It also looks somewhat like a sun combined with a machine like glimpse of the wheels that turn to keep the big city moving along. A simplified Omaha skyline is nestled next to the Missouri River to form our Eastern border.

Artist's statement: All creatures, human and animal, have a need to settle in a place we call home. If the place provides safety and shelter, it’s good. Add loving camaraderie and the place is the ideal of a home. Besides displaying what I think is an interesting design, this heart is a functioning birdhouse. It symbolizes shelter, and can become a home for any small birds that might enjoy living in each other’s company.

Artist's statement: All children, all people, all animals need food. Nebraska is about producing food…for ourselves, our country, our world. Corn is a good symbol for us; a mascot, a symbol of agriculture, an image of the Midwest.

Artist's statement: You see… Without the sun, the moon had no light. The sun shared her beauty and light so that the moon, himself, could be seen by the world. The moon could not help but fall in love with her. She gave him a gift by sharing her own. She allowed him to be the sun of the night. She allowed him to shine bright in all his glory. Every once in awhile, you will see the sun and the moon in sky together so that their lips may touch once more.

I have always been captivated by the moon. Ever since I was little, I remember wishing upon it like a star. As a photographer and adult artist today… My captivation has only grown for its beauty and mystery. Love has also been one of my captivations as an artist because, like the moon, it is also filled with so much beauty and mystery. One night as I was looking up at the moon and listening to a love song…The two just clicked. I immediately became inspired by the Moon and Sun’s star-crossed love story. I stayed up late that night eager to get the idea down on a canvas. Here in Nebraska, we occasionally have days where the Sun and the Moon share the sky together. I cannot help but believe that these are the days designed for the two to meet face to face once more.

Artist's statement: The concept for the Moonlight & Romeo Sculpture is inspired by Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet ~ A modern-day Juliet waits patiently for her Romeo under a heart-shaped moon for all eternity. The moon is painted gold with black shading and real gold leafing. Juliet is made of a fiberglass mannequin. Her dress is made from reproduction pages of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. The pages are printed on waterproof and fade proof paper. The bodice is black with gold swarovski crystal accents. The pages of her skirting are sculpted onto a metal armature. The color scheme is inspired by moonlight, the ceiling disks at the Sheldon Art Museum and the works of Gustav Klimt.

Artist's statement: The concept for the Save a Little Room for Magic sculpture is inspired by J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan and Wendy. A reminder not to darken our hearts to the magic within our own imaginations. At the base of the piece, a metal and paper replica of the book lays open to chapter one. The pages look as though they are magically blowing in the breeze and billow upwards. The black heart represents the night sky, and Captain Hook’s ship is right on course to Neverland on a book page sea. The book, the sea, and the ship are made using metal adorned with waterproof and fade-proof paper. The original book is in the public domain, and the pages are reproduced onto the specialized paper. Hand-painted glitter and Swarovski crystals give the piece a hint of magic.

Artist's statement: The concept for The Key sculpture is that everyone has a key hidden inside their heart. The key unlocks their desire to love, to learn, to give and to create. The sculpture is painted in silver and blush pink acrylic paints. The heart is hollowed out and a door projects outward. Inside the door is a key made of metal and adorned with paint and crystals to look timeless and magical. There are hearts bursting from the doorway with crystals as the key is revealed. The ribbon on the key is created from painted metal.

Directories not only show us where we are on a map, but they list other places we can visit and show how we can get there.

“You Are Here” replaces traditional directions with bold, bright and contrasting designs. The hope is that – rather than engaging in the constant rush that we all experience today- the observer will slow down and enjoy the journey: finding the subtleties in surrounding sights, sounds and activities that will enhance their experience…a reminder to be in the moment.

Artist's statement: One hundred and fifty years ago, pioneers to Nebraska were greeted by something the indigenous peoples of the state already enjoyed, prairie wildflowers. Many of those same plants can still be found in parks, roadsides, farmlands and hiking trails today. I mark the passing of the seasons by the appearance of some of my favorite Nebraska wildflowers as we travel across the state. A few that I look for are the Blue Flag Iris, the Prairie Rose, the Black-eyed Susan and the Purple Poppy Mallow and they are always there, growing by the road in the same place every year. In my own garden I grow some of these same flowers that I imagine were picked for a bouquet by the women who lived here long before me. Time passes but some things connect us to the past and hold a promise to be there in the future. In my heart it is the Nebraska wildflower.

Patron: Kay and Lee Rockwell- Learning never ceases. In memory of our parents and their commitment to education.

Artist's statement: The concept for the sculpture Blank canvas is that we have a choice every day how we write our story. The words we choose to tell ourselves and the ones we project onto others. The piece is painted and primed in white acrylic paint. The words are written clearly and powerfully in black fade-proof ink. The words are written to emulate the shape of the heart on both sides. Each word is chosen to empower the human spirit…with the word “love” being the only word repeated. The calligraphy pen is created out of metal and in the slanted position to let the audience realize they are the authors of the words they choose. The ink is painted and then covered in black glitter to show that words possess power and the magic to change perspective.

Artist's statement: This Nebraska Heart will have a boy mannequin setting on it, holding a fishing pole hoping to catch something for supper! Little does he know what’s under the water waiting for him to catch!

These fish have been developed over several years from a challenge I gave myself to learn to draw fish. Since this all began, I have filled up seven sketchbooks, designed adult coloring books and color posters. They (the fish) have a constant presence in my life. New creative ideas swim in my head and then my imagination overflows with more and more fish!

Artist's statement: This Nebraska Heart represents our beautiful Nebraska sunrises and sunsets. I chose mosaic dots (skittle like) to help make the design more dynamic. This will help to visualize all the beautiful colors we take for granted every day! Our Nebraska landscape helps us to see the vastness of the rising and setting of our sun. In the foreground are the fields of corn.

Artist's statement: This design serves as a companion to a 2015 design for ILLUMINATING LINCOLN, House of Alternating Current – a sculpture now owned by Lincoln Electric System. In similar fashion, this strictly black-and-white design is an exercise of improvisation within limits. Electrical symbols are scattered throughout the surface, the architecture between them suggesting a power grid that connects the symbols conceptually. Black rectangles occur at balanced intervals, representing the paddles of the defibrillator. Electricity has long been an ongoing theme in my work, and when finished this sculpture will be another electrical field, emanating separately as a unique object but also humming along with my larger body of work.

Artist's statement: This Nebraska Heart represents the Nebraska landscape from the beginning of time to present day. From the plowed fields, to the Capitol building. We all recognize familiar places and landscapes, like Chimney Rock, windmills and the State Fair. Nebraska is a wonderful place to live and if you don’t like weather, stick around it will change!

 Beautiful Nebraska, Peaceful prairie land, Laced with the many rivers and the hills of sand. -- Jim Fras, 1960

Patrons: Paige Duncan, Missy Hasselbalch, Megan Davidson, Shelia Schulke, Mary Ebers, Suzanne Sughroue & Sarah Gervais

Artist's statement: You know you’ve earned your stripes as a mother if your child gets a MOM tattoo heart!I love all types of art, but especially tattoos.  They’re the deepest personal reflection of who a person really is.  They can depict struggles, loves, interests, experiences, etc.  The subject matter is endless!I know if I were driving somewhere and saw this giant MOM tattoo heart, it would bring a smile to my face, and give my own heart as a mom a warm feeling.

Artist's statement: When creating this heart my vision was to have each side of the heart representing a different emotion; whether it’s from the same person or two different people. The idea is that the underlying emotions can be merged together and co-exist with one another, even the deepest emotions that may never come to the surface.

Artists' statement: The essence of this design is that each County in Nebraska, would be represented by a unique ceramic heart. A sample of one of these hearts is attached to the board. All 93 hearts would be made with a variety of textures and a variety of color, the result where they are all beautiful but not the same.

Artist's statement: The inspiration for Plane and Plains comes from my parents. My Father loved flying and served in WWII, where he went to Hiroshima after the blast. When I was a child, he flew a little two seat Aeronca Champ that he always called “The Champ”. As a teenager, we travelled all over Nebraska to visit friends and family in a Cessna 172. My Mother is a seamstress and quilter. The Nebraska surface and fields from above always make me think of patchwork quilts.

Artist's statement: My inspiration for this work began with a design created within the heart shape. I then thought to portray water and I realized that I could feature four elements, with two on each side. I enjoy patterns and added the white detail to enhance a rhythmic flow of textures for each element. The white also brings a unity to the two side and all four differing ideas.

Artist's statement: Anyone who has adopted a pet knows that look – the one that pleads with us, “Take me home”; the one that says “Yes, it’s me, I am the one”! And “I promise to be loyal and love you unconditionally”. The bond between pets and their humans is one that stands the test of time. Their pawprints are forever imprinted on our hearts. This design celebrates 2 beloved pets, and the connection we have with them. In the style of Pop Art, the colors are designed to grab your attention while paying homage to a simple subject.

Artist's statement: How can we describe everything nice in Nebraska? Ways we can do it are by painting, illustrating and telling stories about it. We have crops, wildlife, open skies, livestock, fields of flowers, antiques education, settlers and much more. Peasant hard working communities or individual scenes on the farm can be colorful, interesting and amusing. All nice things about Nebraska can combine to make a pretty and colorful image. A person will have to stop and take time to view everything nice in Nebraska.

Artist's statement: Kintsugi is a Japanese term that means “to repair with gold”, and is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with lacquer mixed with gold. Rather than throwing an object away when it is broken, the object is repaired and made stronger, more beautiful, and more valuable. Together with my good friend Michael Leach, who is a practicing therapist, we have taken this concept one step further, and applied it to the human heart. A heart that has been broken through whatever means – love, loss, death, abuse, war, natural disasters, etc. – can be healed, and the person can be stronger, more beautiful and more valuable for the experience. This concept seems particularly appropriate for Nebraska, often considered the heart of America.

I could not have created this heart without the support of my family and friends. A special thank you goes out to Adrian Smith, Morrill Elementary School, all the members of the Sakurada family, and my daughter, Kristin Sakurada Hotz. I sincerely hope you enjoy this piece that I have tried to create.

Artist's statement: The art on this heart truly comes from mine! The barn image is that from my family’s farm which we sold a couple years ago when my parents retired. I spent many a day working, playing and daydreaming in this barn. I know that someday it may no longer exist, so I wanted to capture its image, permanently, for others to also enjoy.

Artist's statement: The people and things that melt my heart are here, in the heart of our nation, Nebraska.

As a teen, I worked at Silver Dollar City in Branson Missouri. Those summers affirmed my penchant for the arts in countless ways. I played the dulcimer in a gazebo in the park, but I was drawn to the glass blowing shop to watch the glass blowers create. As an adult, my fascination with glass blowing continued through the work of Dale Chihuly. I am drawn to the free form shapes, the vivid color and the random and amazing ways glass comes to life.

The prevalence of recyclable plastic prompted me to research and implement the fabrication of plastic art. I find it compelling to take the discarded, the ordinary, and mold it into something quite different and unexpected.

Melting H’Art is an expression of the melting pot of personalities, cultures and the unique way of life found in each county within our state. Every piece of plastic art is different. If you look closely, you will find the letters of the alphabet tucked through out the structure. Search for the first letter of your name, or maybe your hometown. When you find it, know that you are a part of Melting H’Art too. Art is at it’s best when it is shared.

Artist's statement: My proposal would be two sided with corn painted on both sides. One side depicts moonlit cornfield and the other side shows the golden hour when the sun is shining through the corn. I chose to paint corn for this project because corn represents agriculture and agriculture is vital to Nebraska. This symbol is so important to our state that the University chose it as their mascot – and what better symbol would there be to place on campus for a public art display? When I paint I use a multitude of colors. For inspiration I stand in a cornfield and listen to the rustling of the leaves, as the sun slowly sinks to the horizon changing the colors constantly before it’s gone. This intense imagery experience provides me as an artist with feelings I can only express through my work. I grew up in Valley County, Nebraska on a farm and I’ve been painting most of my life. In the past five years I’ve concentrated on painting corn and other aspects of Nebraska agriculture.

Artist's statement: “Love is a powerful source." These words were spoken to me the other day by my oncologist and have echoed in my ears continuously since. One act of love, one gesture, one spoken word can inspire another act of love and this ripple effect has unimaginable power to change a moment.

I moved back to Lincoln, NE one year ago after undergoing treatment for stage 3 breast cancer. I grew up in Grant, NE (Perkins County) and lived there for 17 years before moving to Los Angeles where I lived for 18 years. Both places are home, but Nebraska also has a big piece of my heart.

A few weeks ago I was diagnosed with a relapse of metastatic breast cancer. This is an unimaginable diagnosis and although there is sorrow, what stands out is the love of so many people that has given me strength in this moment. “Possibility” is a love letter and a thank you to all of the people in Nebraska who have been part of my journey. The wonderful thing about love is that it never runs out. There is always more. And not only am I blessed by acts of love, but I can also bless. Love is not only for me to receive, but for me to freely give.

“Possibility” begins with a system inspired by a song like many of my paintings. This system is played out in diamond shapes that expand and contract across the surface of the heart. Each color is hand-mixed so that no two diamonds are exactly the same hue. Each is unique. This particular piece is made up of shades of blue that recall the large, open skies that Nebraska i known for. The placement of each diamond is contingent upon the one placed before so that the final composition would not be possible without each piece, without each act of love.

From our vantage point, we may not always see how one moment impacts another, but when we are given a chance to step back and view the larger picture, we can often see astonishing beauty woven through our lives, through our grief, our pain and our joy.

It is my hope that others who view “Possibility” are filled with a renewed sense of hope and that their despair is replaced by possibility.

Artist's statement: “Love is a powerful source." These words were spoken to me the other day by my oncologist and have echoed in my ears continuously since. One act of love, one gesture, one spoken word can inspire another act of love and this ripple effect has unimaginable power to change a moment.

I moved back to Lincoln, NE one year ago after undergoing treatment for stage 3 breast cancer. I grew up in Grant, NE (Perkins County) and lived there for 17 years before moving to Los Angeles where I lived for 18 years. Both places are home, but Nebraska also has a big piece of my heart.

A few weeks ago I was diagnosed with a relapse of metastatic breast cancer. This is an unimaginable diagnosis and although there is sorrow, what stands out is the love of so many people that has given me strength in this moment. “If I Was… is a love letter and a thank you to all of the people in Nebraska who have been part of my journey. The wonderful thing about love is that it never runs out. There is always more. And not only am I blessed by acts of love, but I can also bless. Love is not only for me to receive, but for me to freely give.

“If I Was…” begins with a system inspired by a song like many of my paintings. This system is played out in diamond shapes that expand and contract across the surface of the heart. Each color is hand-mixed so that no two diamonds are exactly the same hue. Each is unique. This particular piece is made up of shades of blue that recall the large, open skies that Nebraska i known for. The placement of each diamond is contingent upon the one placed before so that the final composition would not be possible without each piece, without each act of love.

From our vantage point, we may not always see how one moment impacts another, but when we are given a chance to step back and view the larger picture, we can often see astonishing beauty woven through our lives, through our grief, our pain and our joy.

I hope that others who view “If I Was…” are filled with an awareness of the powerful love that is there to meet them in each and every moment.

Artist's statement: Lately mosaics have been my medium of choice and I’ve developed a style all my own. I have incorporated shells, rocks, jewelry, hardware, buttons and wood using them with the usual broken plates and mosaic tiles. I would like to make a 3-D mosaic using the same materials as my 2-D mosaics. There will be an abstract, organic feel on the sculptured Heart, which will give a rich, textured feel. (It will be so cool!)

The grout and super burly glue would make it almost impossible to remove any of the pieces from the heart. They will be anchored permanently to the fiberglass form1

Ever since I did the lightbulb in mosaic tiles, I’ve wanted to take what I learned from that project and make another 3-D sculpture! The heart is perfect! To use additional materials (besides just tiles) will add interest and depth to the sculpture. I also would like to make it more colorful and eye-catching!

Much of my inspiration comes from putting to use what I learned from the Light Bulb! You don’t always get a chance for “do-overs”!

Artist's statement: In Scripture, 1st Corinthians 13:13 says “Now faith, hope and love, these three, but the greatest of these is love”.

I think our whole country needs to love more! We’re a mess! I have been inspired to remind people, using the heart as a canvas, how important it is to love one another! Hopefully the shiny surface of the heart covered in tile will remind people what is important – to share God’s love with one another!

Artist's statement: The title for this Proposal is “Beauty” as it focuses on the butterfly and flowers – nature’s artwork – the ‘beauty’ in our world.

Discovering early in my childhood that my bedroom walls provided a great canvas for my crayon creations, also provided great motivation for my mother to channel my artistic flair and get me involved in more appropriate artistic outlets. She made sure I was introduced to a number of community-based day camps, girl scouts, needlework classes…any opportunity to keep my focus off her walls! These formative lessons developed in me, a “See it, like it, create it “ life model. I’ve always believed that I can do anything if I put effort into it. This attitude has served me well through the years, developing skills in varied and diverse art experiences and modalities.

Working as a postal carrier for 30+ years (now retired) allowed me to see nature in all seasons, any weather situation that you can encounter, along with the color changes as the sun moved across the sky. Much of my art takes on the shapes, colors, shadows and images still painted in my mind from my travels through Lincoln’s landscapes.

My passion and love of art, a culmination of life experiences, my bold and very independent personality, and gravitation toward bold, unique (and sometimes brazen) color combinations all contribute to the work I produce.

My Mom would be so proud! My artistic work has led me back to my crayons. By developing a style and technique of melting and blending crayons, I create a one-of-a-kind, unique piece of art that captures my mood and personality, that hopefully visually delights art enthusiasts who view my work.

Art is a very stabilizing force in my life. I can begin working and get so totally immersed in the work that I lose all track of time. Art is calming and helps me relax; visualize as the crayons melt, blend and dance on the canvas, the stress leaves and relaxation enters.

I hope my work is visually appealing and draws you in. As an artist, my hope is that through my enjoyment of creating the work, it has a ripple effect in positively impacting those who view it.

Artist's statement: The idea of this design stemmed from the belief that people come into one’s life for a reason, even if only for a season. As an art educator, I have had many students cross my path. It is my hope that when students crossed my path, their lives were enriched by the experience of art that I facilitated.

There are more students who have crossed my path than I can possibly count, but each of them have left a mark on my heart, proved the powerful effects of art, and reminded me that I am living out my favorite quote by Robert Henri. “The object isn’t to make art, it’s to be in that wonderful state which makes are inevitable”.

Artist's statement: Inspired by the iconic butterfly species commonly known as “monarch” (Danaus plexippus), which is in serious decline due to multiple threats including; widespread use of glyphosate herbicides and neonicotinoids insecticides, cutting of the fir forests, and drought associated with climate change. Monarchs undertake a migration of epic proportions that spans Canada, the United States and Mexico, and Nebraska lies in this very important travel corridor. It is important that the public become aware of the impact we have on these beautiful creatures, and take action to have positive impacts rather than negative.

Artist's statement: A playful moment when a kitten pounces on its favorite pink toy becomes a lifelong, lasting memory. Quirky behavior laced with affection has an unexpected way of comforting our souls and touching our lives. Whether in the joy of the here and now, or in photographic memories of the past, our pets always have a special place in our heart and mind.

This design is dedicated to my favorite cat, Paloma. Ours is a true story of bonding, joy and inspiration.

Artist's statement: The wondrous, magical beauty of nature always inspires me. From a seed to germination I nurture and care for the plant as I watch it grow through various stages. Before long, the seedling has emerged into a well-established plant that soon will bear all of its glory. Strong and tall my plant has emerged with vibrant and bold petals; a flower that now tracks the sun across the sky with its gentle sway. The plant shall give forth its fruit and the cycle of life shall begin again with a seed. Inspirational thoughts start much the same way. Like the seed, with some nurturing care, effort and time, creative endeavors too may turn into something quite wonderful.

Patron: Sysco Lincoln, Eileen Bradbury & Randy Pierce, Bob & Carla Philipps, Roy Lamb and Ron Bradbury

Artist's statement: Nebraska loves “gearheads” and so do I! The talented men in my life love to take things apart, examine how they work, and put them back together again. Many consultations have occurred in the garage and under the hood. Many words of advice have passed over the phone, “how do I make this work again? What is my next step?”Their community and support of each other has created a strong bond that will never be broken.

My family appreciates the experience and knowledge of each other. They depend on it; much like Nebraska. We are surrounded by incredible talent, knowledge, strength and compassion. We come together and make big things happen. The gears may not always turn just right; they may need a little adjusting and repair. But that’s how we learn and how we become stronger. “Together we can do so much.” This quote by Helen Keller is a tribute to the ‘gearheads’ in my life and in the great state of Nebraska.

Artist's statement: Storytime has been one of my earliest and most cherished memories! As a child, my family would read to me. We would explore vast and beautiful vistas of imagination. Our family dog, Brandy, would often join in the circle. It was a wonderful time of love, learning and mentoring. We often would read about history. When we read to children, we reveal history to them. We also continue writing the story into the future. I wonder what chapters they will add as the years go by.

Made of meticulously hand cast bronze, Heartland Story is a tour de force in bronze storytelling. The group of bronze busts are life sized! Of note, my illustrations are not exact to scale. The group will be attached to the painted fiberglass heart with a large circle. Bronze is the pinnacle of traditional artwork. It is extreme in quality and durability , and makes a bold statement to that effect.

I have the privilege of having been entrusted with many monumental artworks nationally and internationally. In my journeys, I have seen work in this genre serve as a link to the past and a bridge to the future.

Artist's statement: Made of bronze, and applied to the dramatically painted heart, Immaculate Heartland is an expression of devotion. The fiberglass heart of Mother Mary wears a bronze crown and flame. The crown wraps around the mid-section of the heart on both sides. Multi-colored flowers adorn her crown. It is a dramatic and powerful statement of a mother’s sorrow and victory dedicated to mother’s everywhere.

Mary travels in the same deep waters of our minds and relationships that art does. She speaks volumes to us on a simple emotional and instinctive level that bypasses the stereotypical banter. We all recognize the love in our mother’s voices.

I have the privilege of having been entrusted with many monument artworks nationally and internationally. In my journeys, I have seen work in this genre serve as a line to the past and a bridge to the future.

Artist's statement: I titled this design “Heartfelt Words” and plan to do the design in a rainbow. The word heartfelt means something that is sincerely and deeply felt. Rainbows are a symbol of hope – they speak to our heart and soul bringing the promise of new beginnings. The words are powerful word that speak to the heart and each of us would be better if we followed.

Artist's statement: My painting is a narrative that invites us to look beyond the surface and discover the interpretation and eloquence of light and living elements. The painting gives a pictorial voice that represents the environmental narrative that exemplifies everything good about Nebraska life. This inspiration is found in my Koi pond of 17 years in my backyard.

Artist's statement: When a person thinks of Nebraska, two things come to mind. The first is Husker football and the second is fields of corn, as far as the eye can see. For this design, I was inspired by this second thought. Corn is the heart of Nebraska/ From the middle to the outskirts, it’s everywhere and only seemed fitting to include it in this design.

Another quality of Nebraska I wanted to include was the many rivers that we have. Many people find peace and tranquility by rivers; and hopefully people can find the same peace when viewing this sculpture.

Artist: Abby Olson for the Broken Bow Art Club, under the direction of Roberta Barnes, Broken Bow art teacher

Artist's statement: During the pioneer settlement of Nebraska, homesteaders learned how to “make do” with what they had. The women of the family would take scraps of cloth and cut them apart to make quilts.

This Nebraska heart depicts many aspects of the patchwork quilt. Patchwork quilts show many colors and patterns. Also this “patchwork” quilt shows many different types of quilt block patterns used to create pieced quilts.

Artists' statement: Solomon Butcher is a prominent figure in the history of Custer County. His dream was to record, through his photography, the life of the early homesteaders in the late 1800’s. Now, a century later, his images give us an insight into the struggles, accomplishments, hopes and dreams of the settlers. Without his photographs, we would have little understanding of the extremes those early settlers endured.

Our heart depicts the history of Butcher in a dream-like cloudscape. The unchanging prairie is depicted in the lower portion of the heart, with the history of the settlers materializing within the clouds.

The base of the sculpture will map out the many towns and villages that existed in Custer County at the time that Solomon Bu`tcher was photographing the settlers.

*All of the Solomon Butcher images that were referenced for the piece were cleared for use through the Nebraska Historical Society.

Artist's statement: The inspiration for this project was threefold – Nebraska’s 150th birthday, the sponsoring groups, and a love of quilting.

The quilt pattern chosen for one side of the heart is a traditional log cabin pattern. Quilters are told that it represents log cabins built on the prairie with red center squares for the hearth. The light values of the block are for the sunny side of the house, the dark values on the opposite side are the shady side of the house.

Quilts were often made with treasured fabric, some hand woven, some salvaged from used pieces of clothing. Pioneer families traveling on the Overland and Oregon Trails often chose to include quilts in the belongings they brought along for the journey, bring comfort to those who lay beneath them.

The second design is a quilted mosaic, many pieces that come together to make a whole. When viewing photo mosaics, the subject becomes clear when viewed from afar. The mosaic represents a welcoming pet, cared for in a loving home.

As with quilting bees, homes with family atmospheres for adolescents, and pet owners seeking help for their pets, close associations with others are so vital for healthy lives. This project represents the joy and contentment that comes from being a part of a loving home, as the quilt block represents.

Artists' statement: This piece is symbolizing that any women, regardless of size, race, religion, or age, can do any career that she wants to do (even if that job is normally done by a male). All of the jobs displayed in this heart show compassion. Some are easier to relate to than others, like the nurse and mother. Yet, the police and army dispatcher also show compassion through different aspects than usually thought. The faces in this piece will remain blank(other than the lips) so that any woman, young or old, can picture herself doing one of these jobs or anything else she would like. The main goal of this piece is to inspire – not just women, but society – to break down the stereotypical walls we built so high and allow everyone to dream big and hope to become whatever they wish.

For the bottom, where the heart comes to a tip, it will have a little girl looking up as if she is dreaming of all the things she could become. For the base, it will look like roots showing that these jobs flow from and to all areas of Nebraska.

Artist's statement: This piece celebrates the richness of Nebraska’s natural resources. Even though they aren’t diamonds, they’re just as precious. I appreciate the fact that this project benefits resources in the state that reach out to those who are in need such as the Boys Hope and Girls Hope organization and The Sadie Dog Fund. I hope this project benefits these two in many ways. When art transcends the beauty of a piece to benefit the greater good of the community, it’s a win-win for everyone!

I’ve come to believe that what a person sees depends on what they’re looking for. Nebraska often gets a bad rap as being a boring state with “nothing to do.” Ask any teenager who has grown up here and many will echo that sentiment. At least I know I used to think that way, having grown up here; but I’ve come to see the richness and beauty of resources in this state.

When I started thinking about this project and the idea that it is celebrating Nebraska’s statehood, I found myself repeatedly returning to this idea of the state often being underappreciated. It seemed to me the state is like a diamond in the rough. The state has grown and progressed in so many ways in 150 years of statehood; and yet there is still more untapped potential. Part of that potential depends on how we take care of the natural resources we have.

Artist's statement: I have always been inspired by the beauty of the Nebraska landscape. My work encompasses this in many forms. Within the last year, I was chosen to depict the Nebraska landscape and sky in fused glass plates to be given to 108 nations around the world representing our beautiful state. Being able to represent the land on the heart form makes this project very near and dear to me. The land and sky are ever changing and I wanted the viewer to be able to see this movement in the piece and the contrast of the acrylic painting and the glass.

The amazing beauty of the Nebraska landscape and sky are created by using glass frit in combination with acrylic paint. Two of my favorite forms of art.

The fused glass method of art is creating by layering small particles of glass, much like the consistency of sand on a clear base of fusible glass. Custom blended frits are created by the combination and experimentation of the available colors of fusible glass. Because of the scientific composition of glass being made with heavy metals, some of these custom colors react when fired, creating totally new colorations. These combinations of colors are significant in creating the clouds and depths of color. There are approximately 50 custom color combinations in this piece. With the landscape and clouds, the use of medium size colored frit was also used to imply heavier or denser coloration.

It is important to note that the use of a clear background glass lets the light transmit through the pieces of glass and can be viewed from both sides. The piece is fired to full fuse. Full fused kiln-forming technique relies on the glass being heated hot enough to become one piece of glass to a temperature of 1450 degrees Fahrenheit and then cooled.

Using acrylic paint shows the difference of composition in the landscape forms giving them more detail.

Artist's statement: The sky in the Great Plains allows one to see a storm roll in for miles, the pink clouds giving the proper salutations upon the arrival and departure of the day’s guest of honor, and a temperamental ocean. The sea below is nearly always calm, busy and brimming with life between the mountains. Through it all, the song of the Meadowlark.

Artist's statement: My inspiration for this piece comes from my own history as the only Nebraskan in my family tree.

in California, Virginia, Kansas, and Missouri. As the years went by, Nebraska remained a refuge…a temporary resting place for celebrating holidays, healing a broken heart, or making plans for my future. But after having my first child the desire for a smaller community, running into familiar faces, and the proximity to my parents became unavoidable. Now I live here in a neighborhood I once coveted, one where I can walk our children to school, the local grocery cashiers know my name, there is a park full of kids across the street, and neighbors who offer help at a moment’s notice. Before, I was just born here. Now, it is home.

The heart will be painted in 10-15 varying jewel toned shades acrylic paint. In each of the 93 blocks of color (half on the back, half on the front), names of all the counties of Nebraska will be hand lettered in black in different fonts. The base can remain white or the sponsor can help choose a color from those used on the heart. The entire heart will be sprayed with a clear protective coating.

Artist's statement: I wanted to design something that would pay homage to the Ferment sculpture at the Nelson Atkins Museum in Kansas City. My father is a retired sheet metal worker. During my childhood, he, my brother and I spent many days playing with pop-rivets. We would rivet random pieces of scrap metal together, and I wanted to pay homage to that as well.

Artist's statement: My inspiration for this sculpture is the Serengeti of Africa. The sunsets, with the trees and animals as silhouettes, are amazing. Because I live in Omaha, Nebraska, I am able to go to the finest Zoo in the world. The Henry Doorly Zoo that is. I am able to see the animals of the Serengeti. My three girls and I have always liked to see the elephants and giraffes. So they became an obvious choice for this sculpture. I chose the Desert Dome of the Henry Doorly Zoo as my backdrop. I have seen the sunset behind the Desert Dome and chose to encapsulate a Serengeti sunset inside my design. The heart will have the look of the Desert Dome with all of its triangles. The sculpture will have the feel of Africa.

Artist's statement: I was fortunate to see the sandhill crane migration at sunset a number of years ago. It was a magnificent sight. This sculpture screams Nebraska. I chose to do a sunset for the heart. The cranes will be made from metal and painted black to give a silhouette look to the piece. They will have a two-dimensional look to them. They will be affixed to the sculpture to give the appearance of flying away from the heart.

Artist's statement: Heart and home are inseparable. For me, that means Nebraska and the beautiful, life-giving trees that grow so easily here.

My life is a stormy tale I did not write but always wanted to . In the 1970’s, I defected from Romania, and I have since become a new person, more than once. I have traveled the world, reinvented myself and grew new branches; but I set down roots again and again in this fertile soil.

I am a great-grandmother now, and I cherish the thought of encouraging all young Nebraskans to grow, to be educated and become the best they can ever be.

I based my design on the Cottonwood, and just like a tree that tries to find new sources of water and grow where it is planted, so should children from all of Nebraska’s diverse backgrounds be encouraged to get an education, remain connected and respectful of each other’s traditions. I hope in this way they will lead the future, with a heart.

Artist's statement: My inspiration for this is drawn from the fact that Nebraska is not just nice, it is the Good Life because we are people who respect one another. We embrace people of differing faiths, beliefs and cultures. We understand and practice freedom daily through tolerance and love, recognizing that though many, we are one. The final Heart art will be a mosaic. It represents the concept of how each individual and different tile is so much greater when joined by the other mosaic pieces to create a masterpiece.

Artist's statement: The proposed design for this Nebraska by Heart was inspired by the work of photographer Michael Forsberg. Forsberg’s book, On Ancient Wings, details the migration of the sandhill cranes of North America. Their annual stop along the Platte River is, according to Forsberg, the largest gathering of any crane species anywhere in the world.

For a few weeks every late winter/early spring, the cranes call Nebraska home. The cranes use their time here to replenish their bodies and to rest before continuing their journey north. The wild beauty of the cranes continues to inspire the thousands of Nebraska residents and tourists from around the world who come to view them every year.

This design illustrates a facet of Nebraska that is older than 150 years. Cranes have migrated along the Platte River for a millennia. They will be here, year after year, long after we have gone. Our witness to the migration of the sandhill cranes binds us to view them every year.

Artist's statement: Patriotism has been an integral part of my life since I was a small child, partially influenced by my father’s military experience in World War II. My parents, along with my Girl Scout experience, combined to generate a sense of pride and national service. My husband, a Veteran of the U.S. Navy (Vietnam – era), and I have played integral roles in numerous Heartland Honor Flights organized by Bill and Evonne Williams (Patriotic Productions) of Omaha. It was truly an honor for me to coordinate the “Home Front” local activities as well as participate in the flights themselves, in the company of our heroic Veterans. Along with my pride of country, is my pride of State, the nation’s 37th State.

Artist's statement: From a gentle breeze to a cow-tipping gale, the wind is a ubiquitous presence in Nebraska. For eons that wind pollinated the grasses of the rolling prairies. Today that wind powers the grand turbines creating clean and renewable power. Wind is an experience that ever Nebraskan knows.

I love to listen to the music of nature that arises when the Nebraska wind comes up. Out on the prairie you can hear the grasses rustle as they roll like ocean waves. In summer, the breezes make the corn fields rattle and clatter. When the storm winds rush across the plains, the trees moan and sway to that fierce music. My Nebraska By Heart piece entitled “The Music of the Wind” is inspired by and evokes that kind of music.

Artist's statement: I remember the first time I stood atop Scotts Bluff. The ranger on duty told us that when our pioneer ancestors reached this point, they had accomplished one third of their journey. I looked all around at the vista from the top of the bluff. It is now surrounded by parceled farm land, but I could imagine the rolling hills of grasses that those pioneers had to cross to make their sojourn. In those days, the grasses grew taller than the wagon wheels and often the heads of the people.

The tallgrass prairie was a unique ecosystem of the Great Plains. It ranged from Canada to Northern Texas, with Nebraska at its heart. It was home to a wide variety of wildlife; birds, gophers, badgers, even bears and bison. It became home to the adventurous of heart who homesteaded and settled on the prairie. I can still imagine the oceans of tall grass surrounding those lonely travelers, making waves across the horizon.

Artist's statement: The weather has always been an integral part of Nebraska life. Its ability to swing from beautiful to extremely violent has always influenced crops, cattle, fortune and failure. This heart is a depiction of a winter storm seen from hundreds of feet above the ground or out of an airplane window as it passes overhead.

Artist's statement: The meaning of my design is a picture I think of when I hear the word Army. I always think not the best when I hear that word, mostly because of my family, and most all died. It will be the same front and back.

Artist's statement: The plan for Metamorphosis would be to turn the heart onto its side, and use additional plastic molding materials to build out a toad, using the heart shape as a base. The toad would be composed of both natural and non-natural materials and will be definitely built in conjunction with 5-17 year old youth at The Bay. The project will include an exploration of materials, using entirely found objects to create texture and pattern.

Toads are native to Nebraska, but also they are sort of delightfully imperfect forms, something you don’t associate with love which if often thought of in an idealized form. Love, real love, is gritty, dirty, and tough. Loving someone day in and day out, is not easy. Loving ourselves day in and day out isn’t easy. Love is messy, and dirty, and also delightfully, incredibly wonderful.

I may be unknown to some of you. I am not a traditional artist. I am 26 and I am not certain what I am. I am determined to tell you some essential pieces of me, and convince you that I will do well by this giant, wonderful piece of heart-shaped plastic.

I am from Lincoln. I went to Boston for college and moved back to Lincoln two years ago. Since I’ve been back I have dove into the “tech world” working at tech startups in the downtown area, teaching coding to girls at Park Middle School, and working with Arts and Humanities students doing community art projects.

I am very interested in the intersection of art and technology. I recently completed a 50 foot crocodile at Turbine Flats. It was a project that I dreamed up and worked on last winter, for fun. I had open studio days every Saturday where I invited kids from the neighborhood to come and build (and play) with me. All the materials were found objects, and the crocodile also incorporated technology in the form of a Bare Conductive Chip, which accepts inputs (much like a midi-controller).

I love primarily to build things with people. I have begun conversations with The Bay, and intend to build the heart together with young people. The crocodile was my most recent, formal collective art-making endeavor.

I am involved in a number of different initiatives in Lincoln. I am a docent at Sheldon and and I hope you will check out my website, www.gretch.in and consider me for this wonderful, exciting opportunity to build something with people – and to have some support in that important effort!

Artist's statement: “If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, excitement, and mystery of the world we live in.” – Rachel Carson

The monarch butterfly has been migrating through Nebraska for thousands of years. For me, the monarch represents an enduring promise that next year, and for many years to come, this magnificent winged creature will return to Nebraska to inspire a sense of wonder, and appreciation for nature’s beauty, but most of all, hope for the future.

“Written on the Wings of the Monarch” will reflect the hope that for many generations to come, children and adults alike will explore and contemplate the beauty of our earth together, keeping alive that inborn sense of wonder. By doing so, we will care deeply for it. This piece will also honor the many generations of Nebraskans who have made our state a reflection of what we value more than anything, our rich tapestry of people.

Artist's statement: Many Nebraskans are aware of our state flower, the Goldenrod, and state bird, the Western Meadowlark, but fewer are aware of Nebraska’s state insect, the Honeybee. This piece gives tribute to the Honeybee, while playing with its shape to mimic the heart.

Artist's statement: The last three years have been a roller coaster for myself and my family. After leaving a job in education which I held for nine years, my family had the choice of moving to New York (where I had a few job offers) or staying here in Nebraska where our family lives. I have been here 15 years, after meeting my wife in school in NY and deciding to relocate to Omaha where my wife and her family live. The roller coaster ride continued recently after I suffered a stroke. Although there were few if any complications, I realized that rather than pursuing the career I was striving for in education, I wanted to go back to my first love and inspiration – art. My experience in theatre and teaching theatre will enable this project to be carried out properly and in a timely manner.

My inspirations for the five renderings which I am submitting are based on some of the values I cherish and encounter every day as a resident of Nebraska. I also consider myself an amateur historian and I was intrigued by Nebraska’s anniversary, the project and helping others. Overall, the symbol of a heart with an arrow through it represents love but also a “broken heart”. The arrow symbolizes the American Indian and how their lands were taken away. We must all fight for our freedom. The sky behind the silhouettes represents either a dusk or a dawn. While some of our beliefs change (dusk), those that adapt to change survive (dawn).

Artist's statement: My inspiration for a rainbow and rain and sunshine is my 6 year old granddaughter Cayla Jo. She was born when I was 60 and retired. I was in my own little world , then she came along. I babysat with her 45 hours a week from the time her mom went back to work until kindergarten. It had been a long time since I rocked a baby to sleep, sang lullabies, read children’s books and had tea parties. She opened my eyes to a whole new world that I had not been a part of. We had one son, so a little girl who is funny, smart and had a wonderful imagination kept me on my toes and I saw through her eyes the joy of walking in rain puddles, jumping rope, princess dress up and “I get to be the Queen”. Now she is in first grade and it is so amazing how she absorbs so much information each day to share with me when I pick her up after school. She’s my “rainbow” rain or shine.

Artists' statement: “Even when the heart is broken, beaten, and bruised, a light of hope will always shine through”

The heart we are proposing to create is made out of polygon triangular shapes. These shapes would create the bulk of the structure and each facet would have either glass mirror or colored glass attached with epoxy or finished with grout.

The different facets of the heart represent the different facets of our state, our community and of our lives: the ways we live and work, all coming together to create a place that is at the very heart of our nation. Each fragment will be colored glass or a mirror. The mirror fragments are in response to our previous idea of taking away some of the fragments to reveal an interior light. With the addition of mirrored glass we will be using the light from outside the form to create a “light from within”.

The idea that all of us have a fragment of ourselves missing, or that many people feel broken, there is still light that can reflect from this experience and be a fragment of something greater than ourselves. The illuminating light that will be reflected from the heart’s mirrored fragments, is the light of others from without. As high school students who often feel as if we are living fragmented lives, or within a fragmented community, when all the pieces come together and we work together, life is better.

Sponsored by Jocelyn Lippincott Reiss, art specialist. Artists representing Lincoln North Star High School: Deanna Allen, Sarah Cronin, An Pham, Laila Hasan, Alexandar Rooks, Jasmine Suarez, Billy Le, Andres Novoa, Azizkhon Youldashev.

Artist's statement: Some people grew up in small communities where they could circle their home town in 5 blocks. They road bikes to the grocery store and walked across the street to get to the city pool. Some lived on farms and were raised to take care of crops and animals. Others grew up in big cities where they drove thirty minutes to get home by crossing bridges and passing downtown buildings. And if you’re like me, you grew up praising Husker Football and you couldn’t find anyone not wearing red on a Sunday in Fall. No matter which lifestyle we grew up with, we all have something in common – we are Nebraska. This place is truly incredible, and I constantly find myself being more thankful for the sense of community I’ve found in this state. When designing my proposal, I wanted to show that no matter what our backgrounds might be, we all hold Nebraska close to our hearts. Whether we’re big city living or small town folks, we all belong to the state of the two finger wave and the Cornhuskers. We’re connected in more ways than one, and I am so excited to share all of the amazing things that make up this state through this sculpture.

Artist's statement: Agriculture built and has sustained Nebraska’s economy, and with corn being so visible in the state – from the crops to the Nebraska Cornhuskers – I believe corn will keep beating strong in Nebraska in the future.

Adjustable String Bracelet

Childrens Color Bracelet, Childrens Color Changing Ring - Quzhiling,https://www.qiaodeshipin.com/