These day ordering a craft beer in a bar, usually comes accompanied by a shot of confusion: How much will this pint cost me? I may pay $4 for a “pint” of pale ale at my local brewpub, or $7 in a city bar. Pints start at $9 or $10 at beer bars in Las Vegas, and I may be expected to pay up to $15 for a pale ale in Manhattan (seen it happen, friends). I say “pint” in quotes because in most places you’re going to get the standard-looking glass, but what it actually contains usually ranges between a miserly 11 ounces to the full 16 ounces. The amount depends on the owner’s whim (or profit margins), so caveat your emptor on that, too. First off, this isn’t Uncle Sam’s fault. Unless you live in the handful of states with abnormally high beer taxes (Tennessee, Alaska, Alabama, Georgia and Hawaii), beer taxes in the U.S. are relatively low. Even in Tennessee, it’s only $1.29 per gallon, plus about a dime a gallon in federal tax for most craft beers—that breaks down to about 17 cents a pint. It’s an annoying sin tax, but it’s not gonna break you. Well, big strong beers cost more, for reasons both obvious and not so obvious. There’s more stuff in big beers, to be sure, but the way they pus...